"Sir Gawain And The Loathly Lady" By Selina Hastings

745 words - 3 pages

In the story "Sir Gawain and the Loathly Lady", Sir Gawain was loyal, true and a perfect knight. The story itself is about King Arthur who will be killed by Sir Gromer if he does not figure out what women truly desire. He searches England asking women this question, but none have the correct answer. He then meets Dame Ragnell who is the ugliest women ever. She claims to have the real answer but won't tell him unless he lets her marry Sir Gawain, the kings trusted knight. Sir Gawain said that he will marry her. Dame Ragnell tells the king that what women most desire is sovereignty. The king then meets with Sir Gromer and gives him his answer. Sir Gromer gets angry and tells the king it was his sister that gave this answer. Later, Sir Gawain gets married to Dame Ragnell and she became beautiful at night. She then told him she could only be pretty during night or day. It was his choice. Then he said I cannot decide so I will let you choose. Therefore, because Sir Gawain gave her sovereignty the curse that had made her ugly was broken. From then on she remained pretty."I would rather die myself I love you so." Is what Sir Gawain said to King Arthur when he told him he could soon die. This all proves that Sir Gawain is loyal. I also have friends that are loyal. I feel they are loyal because they do many things that have helped me that they did not have to do. Also, in the Lord of the Rings, Faramir was ordered by his father to do an act that would be certain death for him and his soldiers. This is another example of ones loyalty to another person. Just like when Sir Gawain married ugly Dame Ragnell in order for the king to live. In the end, this loyalty helped Sir Gawain because Dame Ragnell later became beautiful.Sir Gawain is true in heart. Sir Gawain said he would marry Dame Ragnell in order to save the kings life. "I shall wed her and I shall wed her again." So, after the king told this to...

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