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Smithsonian Institution And James Smithson By:Cline Wooten

733 words - 3 pages

The Smithsonian Institution is sometimes known as the American attic institution. Because of one man, people are able to go to the biggest museum in the world. It has almost 140 million artifacts and specimens in it. It contains 15 museums and a zoo. The museum is dedicated to public education, national service, and scholarships in arts, science, and history. James Smithson is a very important man. He helped America build one of our most prized possessions, the Smithsonian.James Louis Macie was born in 1765 in Paris, France. His mother gave birth to him in secret. James father's name was Hugh Smithson, which was the first Duke of Northumberland and was one of the first patrons of the 18th century. James mother and father were not married when they had James. His mother was a wealthy widow from England.James Louis Macie entered Pembroke College in 1782. He excelled in chemistry and mineralology. In college, he joined the prominent French geologist Barthelemy Faujas de St. Fond on his tour of Scotland, with a group of scientist. In1786, he received his master's degree from Pembroke College. He went to London and joined many prestigious scientist groups.James Macie inherited money in 1800 from his mother who passed away. Within a month from his mother's death, Macie changed his surname to Smithson, the name of his father. Smithson wrote his will in 1826 and shortly after writing his will James Louis Macie Smithson died in 1829. He is buried in the English Protestant cemetery. James Smithson left all of his money to the United States which totaled up to about $500,000.Smithson had many accomplishments. He was an amazing scientist and was inducted to the Royal Society. It is Britain's oldest and most prestigious society. He was at that time the youngest member. Smithson traveled many places in Europe. Some of the places were Switzerland, England, Germany, Italy, Scotland, and France. He donated the money to the United States and he had never been there before in his life. He trusted the United States to make the best use of the money.The Smithsonian Institution was built in 1855, but before it was built Congress had some trouble deciding what to do with the money. They thought of many things. A university, astromical observatory, scientific...

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