Social Policy Comprehensive Critique: Abortion Essay

1827 words - 7 pages

AbstractThe purpose of this paper is to critique the social policy issue of abortion as well as write a critical review of the policy issue. We live a nation on the idea of freedom, freedom of choice and freedom of expression, yet we are not free. The oppositions of society create restraints for women seeking abortions. The pro-choice view of abortion believes that every woman has a right to an abortion. In addition, women have full control to make decisions concerning their bodies. From this stand point, it is believed that life does not begin until birth. Pro-choice activist do not encourage abortion in anyway. Rather, they acknowledge the implications of an abortion and imply certain flexibility depending on each case.According to Almanac of Policy Issues (n.d.) on January 22, 2001, President George W. Bush issued an executive order directing the U.S. Agency for International Development to halt federal funds going to family planning groups that support abortion (Almanac of Policy Issues, n.d.).Other bills have since been passed to either curtail abortion or confer personhood on fetuses. The National Abortion Right Act League (2004) argues that without legal abortion, women would be denied their constitutional right to privacy and liberty. Legislators should not be able to dictate what will happen to a woman's body.The purpose of this paper is to critique the social policy issue of abortion as well as write a critical review of the policy issue. We live in a nation built on the idea of freedom, freedom of choice and freedom of expression, yet we are not free. The oppositions of society create restraints for women seeking abortions. The pro-choice view of abortion believes that every woman has a right to an abortion, and women have full control to make decisions concerning their bodies. From this stand point, it is believed that life does not begin until birth. Pro-choice activist do not encourage abortion in anyway. Rather, they acknowledge the implications of an abortion and imply certain flexibility depending on each case. Day (1995) states that before 1973 abortion was illegal in this country forcing millions of women to obtain illegal abortions. Between 1946 and 1972 it is estimated that there were anywhere from 11 million to 32 million such abortions. That resulted in the deaths of over 7, 000 women nation wide, additionally denying their rights to privacy and liberty (Day, 1995).According to Almanac of Policy Issues (n.d.) on January 22, 2001, President George W. Bush issued an executive order directing the U.S. Agency for International Development to halt federal funds going to family planning groups that support abortion. Coile (2001) suggests that Bush issued the gag rule when he was on his third day of office. The order infuriated abortion rights activists, but was applauded by religious conservatives. The decision came on the 28th anniversary of the Roe v. Wade court case, which established a constitutional right to abortion. The...

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