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Society Of Blake (An Analysis Of The Poet William Blake)

1015 words - 5 pages


Society of Blake
(An Analysis of the Poet William Blake)


William Blake is one of the greatest Romantic writers of his time period, and his works are still being read and interpreted today. He wrote in ways that had not been seen before, in two different parts. One part would be the opposite of the other, covering both sides of story and it was a very invigorating new and improved way to write, that paved the way to the future. The first passage, “The Lamb” is a very great beautiful story, speaking from a child who is talking to a small lamb. This child is asking the lamb about where he came from, and what actually made him, or if he really even knows it is a statement for ...view middle of the document...

Throughout all these poems, Blake was trying to express his ideals of society during his time, the funny thing is, that even though that was decades ago it still applies to todays society as well.
In the first two passages, they are the complete opposite of each other, and in this relation Blake expresses what society is. He splits society into two large parts; innocence and wisdom. The lamb signifies the innocence in the world, or what may be considered to inexperienced or clueless, they have no knowledge of what could happen to them or the dangers that have beheld them, “Dost thou know who made thee Gave thee life & bid thee feed. By the stream & o’er the mead; Gave thee clothing of delight, Softest clothing wooly bright;” (Page 748 Lines 2-6). They have no idea what their purpose is or who created them, this identifies them as the people in the world who have no idea whats going on or the dangers that could happen to them, they get stepped on. The next people, who Blake uses the metaphor of a Tyger, are the people with knowledge, they know what is coming, giving them time to avoid the situation entirely. These are the people that take advantage of the lambs, “When the stars threw down their spears And water’d heaven with their tears: Did he smile his work to see? Did he who made the Lamb make thee?” (Page 749 Lines 17-20). These two types of people are needed in any society, there always needs to be people for the upper level to stand on, however terrible it actually is.
In the second passage, “The Chimney Sweeper” this story that the child tells expresses how society views the lower class, and how they are treated because of it. The children of england during this time period were used as slaves basically, doing the hard...

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