Society’s Expectations Of A Female’s Body Image

2600 words - 10 pages

Society’s Expectations of a Female’s Body Image

Society plays many roles in peoples’ lives. The biggest role that society plays with females is how they should appear. All over the television, movies, and different magazine covers, females come into view as looking very thin and beautiful. People that see these famous females begin to idealize that body image. The male gender also visualizes these famous females and thinks that all females should have this slender appearance. As the year 2000 rolled in, actresses and models’ body weight decreased, and their waiflike bodies became more noticeable in the public’s eyes. Many little girls grow up idealizing the people in the public eye, giving them the idea that they must look a certain way, which is not a healthy way. These little girls grow up to become teenagers and then discover adulthood. The image that they grew up visualizing only worsens when they hit puberty and their bodies go through drastic changes, which makes them realize their bodies do not look like the people they grew up bearing in mind. When females realize they will not be able to accomplish the same body that the famous acquire, they become very self-conscious and some even develop eating disorders. The media’s role in self-images has greatly affected the way people perceive themselves in today’s society.

In this paper, I will discuss the different rhetorical techniques that six diverse authors use to get their point across to the reader. All of the articles that I had analyzed used pathos as a technique. There were two of the six articles that used ethos as a method. These two articles were Slim Pickings by David Butler and Do You Have a Body Image Problem? by Dr. Katharine A. Phillips. Phillips moral values or interests are because she has the title of a doctor; however, Butler’s ethical appeal comes from the website that sponsored his article. Society and Eating Disorders by Colleen Thompson and Eating Disorders by Katherine Fox both discuss the issue of eating disorders due to the way society and the media put the ideal image into a female’s mind. Both of these articles mainly use the social appeal to make their readers aware of this issue. The last two articles, Perfection – The Barbie Body?! written by Julie Hong and Expectations of a Fashion Model authored by Popular Culture, discuss the female’s body as an object. These two articles also use social appeal to help the reader better understand how females grow up idealizing an unrealistic body. All six of these articles were all very informative and well written, even though they all used different techniques to get their point across. All of the authors used pathos as their main appeal, but they used it in different forms.

The most important rhetorical technique is ethos, which only two of the different articles used. The reason ethos is so important is because it tells the reader whether or not the author’s...

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