Society´S Law In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

1375 words - 6 pages

F i n a l P a p e r: L a w s v e r s u s M o r a l s
Starting at the very beginning of the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain – Huck Finn says that he does not want to conform to society’s laws, yet for a long span of the novel Huck debates in his mind whether to go with what his heart tells him to do or to follow through with what society requires of him. There are some fairly distinctive pieces of evidence within the novel that support the idea that there was a conflict between Huck’s moral values and society’s laws. Huck faces many punishing situations where he has highly conflicting feelings towards his own personal morals and the laws of society where he must ...view middle of the document...

That’s what she done.’ I got to feeling so mean and so miserable I most wished I was dead” (Twain 87). This quote helps us to understand Huck’s initial feelings of inadequacy and conflict. He knows that he is not only breaking the law, but he is also breaking the heart of someone who would cause him no harm.
Huck doesn’t understand why he is helping Jim escape from slavery or how helping Jim will benefit him in any way. At one of the most major turning points of the novel, Huck was debating whether or not he should report Jim to the men at the river. Right as Huck was seriously thinking about turning Jim over to the authorities, he had a sudden realization of passion and his opinion on the matter changed instantly and drastically, “It hadn’t ever come home to me before, what this thing was that I was doing. But now it did; and it stayed with me, and scorched me more and more. I tried to make out to myself that I warn’t to blame, because I didn’t run Jim off from his rightful owner” (Twain 87). Huck decided not to reveal Jim to the men because he realized that there is more to assisting him to freedom than what he originally thought. Besides all of the trouble Jim has caused him, he has developed a unique friendship that Huck has never had before and will now cherish forever, even if it mean that he must break the law to keep them together.
In the story, there is another scene in particular where Huck follows his heart instead of following the rules and laws of the people around him. Farther down and beyond the river, Huck and Jim encounter two con men that take control of their raft and essentially bludgeon Huck and Jim to participate in their scams. The two con artists who claim to be a King and a Duke have them under their control. Huck proves himself worthy as he is, according to The Law According to Huck by Joanna Weiss, quiet the master of deception “Huck invents believable stories at the drop of a hat and uses clever tricks to cover his frequent slip-ups. When he forgets the fake name he assumed as a guest of the Grangerfords, Huck issues a challenge to young Buck Grangerford: ‘I bet you can’t spell my name.’ Buck’s replay, ‘G-o-r-g-e J-a-x-o-n,” furnishes him with the information he needs” (Weiss 1). After time goes on and scams continue, it becomes too much for Huck to handle. Huck had fallen in love with one of the niece’s of the dead men and could not fathom stealing money from her so he decides to tell her the entire story instead and tells her who the...

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