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Society & Culture How Do Identity, The Effects Of Discrimination And Degrees Of Equality Affect Aboriginal Australian's In Australian Society?

1060 words - 4 pages

Society & CultureHow do identity, the effects of discrimination and degrees of equality affect Aboriginal Australian's in Australian society?It is well know that Aboriginals are discriminated against due to their identity and suffer from an absence of equality in the Australian society. The Macquarie dictionary states the meanings of identity as: the condition or fact of remaining or being the same one, discriminate as: to note as different, and equality as: the condition of being equal: the same in quality, degree, value, rank, ability, etc. The Federal Government defines an Aboriginal person as someone who:·Is of Aboriginal decent;·Identifies as an Aboriginal person; and·Is accepted as such by the Aboriginal community in which he or she lives.The definition rejects the purely racial classification of the past and includes modern social and cultural factors.There are clear differences between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians across all displays of value of life. Aboriginals are identified as the most disadvantaged group in Australia. Aboriginals experience the lowest standards of health, education, employment and housing, and are over represented in the criminal justice system. The differences today between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginals is linked back to the White settlers and the White Australia policy. Consider the history of the treatment of Aboriginals. Children were taken from their parents, many Aboriginals were massacred and "round ups" of Aboriginals divided them from their land. Combined with exposure to European disease, the aboriginal population was decimated. This leads to conflict between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginal Australians.Aboriginals became the minority group with a low social class in Australian society hence the attraction of racism, prejudice and discrimination. Aboriginal Australians make up approximately 2% of Australia's population.Aboriginals are not even close in education compared to non-Aboriginal Australians. Only 32% of Aboriginal children complete schooling and only 1.3% of higher education students are aboriginals. School is a socialising agent and with Aboriginal children and adolescents not completing or attending school a barrier can form between them and the macro world. Poor educational results affect employment prospects, which then leads to a poorly paid job and lack of income, which reinforces negative self-image. If Aboriginals have a poor self image and are constantly facing racist remarks they will see no point in trying to achieve a high degree of education or employment therefore they will continue to have poor housing, creating a low social status and the poverty cycle will never end.Aboriginal Australians do not receive equal opportunities when it comes to employment to non-Aboriginal Australians. In the 1996 census the unemployment rate for Aboriginals was 23% compared to that of 9% for non-Aboriginal Australians. In 1996, 14.9% of all Aboriginal employment...

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