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Socio Political Discourse Essay

1014 words - 5 pages

Evidently, sport events have been used by regimes to promote tourism and economic growth within the host region (Dobson, 2000). As previously mentioned, the desire to host such events is often associated with city regeneration and the perceived economic benefits (Getz, 2005; Hall, 2004; Misener & Mason, 2008 Misener & Mason, 2009). In the United States, the media often reports most international sport events as having significant positive impacts (Wilson, 2006). Nonetheless, the magnitude of the event’s impacts, either positive or negative, are often dependent on the event’s size (Taks, Kesenne, Chalip, Green, & Martyn, 2011). Large events are often thought to attract media attention, ...view middle of the document...

International sport federations generally have a monopoly on advertising and stadium space, in addition to receiving payments associated with bidding fees and event-hosting rights (Kesenne, 2005; Desai & Vahed, 2010).
The Canadian Sport Tourism Alliance (CSTA) is considered the industry leader and expert in regards to the Canada’s sport tourism industry. They consider the Economic Impact Analysis (EIA) the industry standard for measuring the economic impact of sport events (CSTA, 2014). Nonetheless, the legitimacy of EIA remains a point of contention (e.g., Taks et al, 2011). EIA is based on an input-output (I-O) model by which the total amount of additional expenditure within the host city is converted by a multiplier analysis to the net income, while accounting for the local economy’s leakages (Gratton & Taylor, 2000). Critics of the EIA I-O model argue that multipliers are often overinflated and that it is an ineffective method to analyze the impacts of events that are short-term in duration (Matheson, 2009; Porter & Fletcher, 2008). Taks, et al. (2011) found in their analysis of the economic impact of the 2005 Pan-American Junior Athletic Championships significant variance between the standard EIA compared to that of a Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA). CBA is based on the principles of welfare economics. It identifies which of the EIA’s inputs provides a benefit and which is a cost to the local population (Kesenne, 2005). In order to do so, the CBA accounts for all costs, including opportunity costs, and all benefits, including local residents’ perceived value of the event (Barget & Gouguet, 2010). Taks, et al. (2011) impact studies highlighted that the perceived success of an event can vary depending of which impact measurement is used. For example, The EIA revealed that the 2005 Pan-American Junior Athletic Championships produced a net increase in economic activity whereas the CBA indicated a negative net benefit (Taks et al., 2011). This is an important finding; as such results may influence the community to perceive the hosting of sport events as being beneficial to the local economy when in fact they may be detrimental.
Although sport events are generally associated with economic impacts,...

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