Sociological Classes Essay

942 words - 4 pages

Evanne JimenezReflection 1This chapter of sociological classes is about the reality of everyday life, how we are, think and interact consciously day to day. . We have two aspects that are always being fulfilled the "here" and the "now". In other words, everything we do on a routine basis is temporal and ultimately has everything to do with the fact that we have a finite amount of time in our conscious lives. For example, participation in an athletic event; after a certain amount of time people become physically limited, or age, and knowing this puts pressure on our consciousness to preform while we are still able. It is like we have an expiration date and we must fulfill our conscious lives before time runs out. In addition, this reality of everyday life is shared with others. That is to say that we affect and are affected by the people we interact with. For example, the most important form of interaction is when we interact face to face. Here, we are sharing the same temporal and spatial reality, which forms an awareness of your connection with others.This chapter is further broken down into two parts. In part one as I mentioned earlier we revisit the idea of the reality of everyday life and how we continually try to understand it. We interpret reality in a way that is subjectively meaningful to us and not to the logical or rational world. We constantly take this world of everyday life for granted, not only in how it is meaningful to us as individuals, but also how our actions and thoughts affect and maintain this world. So the question is asked; how can we attempt to clarify the foundations of knowledge in everyday life and find how the commonsense world is constructed? This process cannot be done in any form of scientific manner, but rather in a purely descriptive or empirical way. As we analyze the subjective experience of everyday life it is important to remember that commonsense contains countless cause and effect interpretations about everyday reality that are also taken for granted, and we must acknowledge this. Taking this into account, our first point is that consciousness is always intentional and directed at something. And second, we are conscious of the existence of multiple realities and the idea that our consciousness is able to move through these different realities. These transitions are physically experienced, for example waking up from a dream. Among the multiple realities, the one that presents itself foremost is the reality of everyday life, therefore, our level of consciousness is highest in this reality. It forces us to be attentive to it in the utmost way, so, we say that we experience everyday life in the state of being wide-awake. The wide-awake state is taken to be...

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