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Sociological Theories Of Deviance Essay

929 words - 4 pages

In the world we live in today, deviance happens to play an integral role in within the societies that scatter our globe, whether we like it or not. Deviance describes actions or behaviors that violate the social norms of our society. These behaviors can violate formally enacted rules, such as laws that are put into place by government, as well as the informal type of “guidelines” that various cultures have informally established and shaped for themselves. As one may come to understand, norms are essentially expectations that are standard to a certain culture. These norms gently guide people in a society in “what to do,” and “what not to do,” in compliance with their societies' norms. With ...view middle of the document...

Upon association with a counter-culture, one has the potential of participating in their acts of deviance. For example, if we take immigration into account, youth that have immigrated to the United States with their parents are exposed to a new social structure upon entering public schooling. If they happen to associate with a group of students that are part of a counter-culture, this re-socialization which is in compliance of a counter culture, is a perfect example of the cultural transmission theory. A teen that has immigrated into the United States has the ability to learn deviant behaviors by interacting with American students of a counter-culture.
As for the labeling theory, we have come to learn that this theory is based on a subjective standpoint. The labeling theory considers the idea that behaviors are deviant only when a specific individual, or group of individuals, has defined it in this way. In time, an individual being dubbed as deviant by a significant other may come to terms with this new title, and in a sense “accept their fate.” In this case, their deviant acts become habits. The group of individuals that usually posses the power of defining the basis of what is deviant and what is not deviant, are usually those that are of high status in society, such as various sectors of government and those with significant achieved or ascribed titles. For example, a policeman would be a figure that possesses an utmost power of being able to define deviance on subjective terms. Another example would be a judge. These figures in society have highly regarded perceptions by the greater society, and are seldom questioned for their judgement.
Lastly, there is the control theory. This theory considers the idea that...

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