Soils Report

1348 words - 5 pages ✓ Expert Reviewed

The soil sample I chose for this report is a piece of land I rented two years ago. On the land, I ran three one acre inbred increases and a seven acre isolation plot for Pannar Seeds. I chose this particular field because of the degree of flatness it has in certain parts of it. In order for the yield results of the 1,250 different inbreds to be accurate, it was extremely important that the isolation plot was placed on level ground and all the same soil type. The field has a total of 114 acres it is located in Kandiyohi County Minnesota. The legal description of the land would be the South East one-fourth of section eight of the Lake Andrew Township. The GPS coordinates are 113◦N and 59◦W. The average annual air temperature is 48◦F and the annual rainfall is around 33 inches. The depth to the water table is around 40 feet in this area of the county.
This past year there was soybeans on the field. It has been on a corn and soybean rotation at least the past ten years. My management practice for this field would be the same as it has been previously but with possible tiling and soil sampling throughout the field to put down a variable rate dry fertilizer application. The tile would help to drain the two low wetland areas in the field and make them farmable. The variable rate fertilizer is an easy step up from your normal broadcast application. To be able to do this, the field should be sampled throughout, not just in certain small locations. I believe this would add great fertility to the spots needing more nutrients than what the average application puts down. Erosion is not a big issue in this field due to the flatness and the small stream running through the east side.
There are seven soil types in this 114 acre field. The largest being Wadenhill-Sunburg Complex it makes up 51.7% or 59.1 acres of the field. The parent material of this soil is till. That means it was quickly deposited by a forming and melting glacier. The landform of this soil is hills on moraines. I chose this soil as my good soil in the field. I chose this as the good soil because of how level the ground lays and it is a well-drained soil. The taxonomic name of this soil is course loamy mixed superactive mesic Typic Hopudolls. The land capability class is 2E for this soil. This means that it is able to grow most production crops: also it has erosion limitations from being a loamy soil on slight hills.
The soil I chose as my bad soil is Klossner Muck. It is made up from organic material over loamy deposits. This means that it was all, at one time, organic matter that has broken down and because it is a low spot that is currently covered in cattails; none of the top soil has eroded and just continued to pile up. Therefore, the top layer of soil is 24 in. deep. The landform that it lays on is depressions on moraines. This soil makes up 5.1% or 5.9 acres of the field. I chose this soil as the bad soil for its inability to drain any water that runs onto...

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