Southern Women In The Civil War

1622 words - 6 pages

Women during the Civil War were forced into life-style changes which they had never dreamed they would have to endure. No one was spared from the devastation of the war, and many lives were changed forever. Women in the south were forced to take on the responsibilities of their husbands, carrying on the daily responsibilities of the farm or plantation. They maintained their homes and families while husbands and sons fought and died for their beliefs. Many women took the advantage of their opinions being heard, and for the first time
supported their cause in anyway they could.
Whether a woman was the mistress of a plantation or the wife of a yeoman farmer, her life was defined by work. Only a small number of women, those related or married to the South's premier planters escaped the demands of society. Plantation women passed quickly from carefree belles to matrons in charge of children, often overseeing the work of household slaves. Many mistresses, especially those on smaller plantations, did work, taking on tasks seen as too insubstantial for slaves, including making candles, sewing clothes, and preparing certain foods. All of these duties were to be done while preserving the mannerisms their husbands expected (Grander, 3).
"After the soldiers left, silence and anxiety fell upon the town like a pall, what should we do next? To be idle was torture" (Confederate, 24) Sara Pryor wrote in her diary. Since women were not allowed to fight in the war they provided clothing, tents, and other supplies for the soldiers who would. Judith McGuire wrote, "Ladies assemble daily, by hundreds, at the various churches, for the purpose of sewing for the soldiers" (Confederate, 25). Many women were excited by the idea of being able to support their cause. The women of society made clothing and bandages for the soldiers. The women who were brave enough to work in the munitions factories usually poor women made cartridges for the soldiers' rifles. Many women were beginning to notice changes in themselves and the other women around them. Sallie Putnam wrote, "Those who had formerly devoted themselves to gaiety and fashionable amusements, found their only real pleasure in obedience to the demands made upon their time and talents, in providing proper habiliments for the soldier… the devotee of ease, luxury and idle enjoyment, found herself transformed into the busy seamstress" (Confederate, 26).
Before the war women who lived in or near cities could, if status and funding permitted, lead slightly easier lives than rural women. General stores lined the streets, selling all types of merchandise, from sewing machines to washboards. Newspapers advertised both ready-made clothing and the services of expert seamstresses and milliners. Produce grown in backyard gardens was available for purchase, and local farmers carted their surplus into town. Churches, schools, and theaters offered social and cultural outlets. The sociable elite enjoyed dinner and card parties...

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