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Stability, Silence, And Progression: Analysis Of Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World

1392 words - 6 pages

Humans are not meant to be alone permanently because isolation drives people to craziness, transforming the need of companionship into an insatiable desire. When humans associate with one another, the thirst of sociability quenches and morphs into either happiness or progression. The futuristic society Brave New World encourages the former of happiness upon its citizens through repeated, whispered lessons, or hypnopaedic messages, at night during early childhood. The hypnopaedic messages function as values for all of the society’s caste members, promoting the ideas society regulates and deems as correct, such as limited progress. The whisperings also influence the civilians slightly more than advertisements do in modern society. For example, East Carolina University broadcasts a brightly colored advertisement in a magazine in the hopes that it will inspire students to attend the college. East Carolina University desires that the inner needs of progression and companionship of the viewer fulfill themselves for the benefit of the university, and eventually, the viewer itself. In his novel Brave New World, Aldous Huxley’s society abolishes solitude by conditioning the citizens to always surround each other, stunting progress, whereas East Carolina University instigates progression by encouraging students to interact with their aspiring peers, showing that both communities draw upon the bandwagon technique to appeal to the need for sociability.
The society in Brave New World conditions the people to never think, forcing them to engage with other people and reflect a common value. For example, one night Alpha-Plus worker Bernard Marx and the beautiful Lenina travel on a date to several locales, such as the Sumo-Wrestling Championships and the English Channel, finally ending the date by going to bed together. The end of date irks Bernard, who the next day rants to Lenina about how he wishes he could have ended the date differently and, in turn, feel something passionately. Confused, Lenina responds with one of the taught hypnopaedic messages: “When the individual feels, the community reels” (94). The message in itself is one of the numerous statements that use repetition, and in this case rhyme of the words “feels/reels,” to imbed moral values in the citizens, taking the bandwagon technique—the use of a group of people to signify the importance of the product—to the extreme. The bandwagon technique implements itself in the citizens, shown when the people follow their peers in order not to feel isolated, thereby reinstating the message. Here, Lenina uses the message as a warning for Bernard to stop thinking about feelings because individual thought is highly condemned and frowned upon in their society. However, Mustapha Mond, the World Controller of Western Europe, is an exception of free thinking. While walking around the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre’s gardens, Mustapha Mond addresses a group of young Alpha men learning about the...

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