Stages Of The Development Of Personality

2079 words - 8 pages

In creating a family genome for a class, I found mine is filled, from all angles, with addicts, criminals of sorts, pedophiles, many had psychological deficits and a few committed suicide. Each had an intricate story of their own that contributed to how mine began. One could say I was doomed from the time the sperm hit the egg. I’d have even agreed when only looking from a psychoanalytical or a biological point of view. As I grew from child to young adult, my perspective changed to that of a cognitive behaviorist. I tried to incorporate a psychoanalytic perspective in tweaking my negative cognition and behaviors. Ultimately, that led my personality to grow beyond a Freudian view. As my personality developed further, I adopted a humanistic point of view.

The psychoanalytic approach doesn’t rely on the principle of freewill. Children also do not have the capability of making choices that will affect their lives. They depend on their caretakers to make these critical decisions. Psychoanalytic theory reflects the person’s past to gather data about why they have negative thoughts, emotions, or behaviors. My childhood like everyone else’s was out of my control and therefore, much of it I felt rejected and much like a failure.

It is a human parent’s natural responsibility to care for and guide their offspring but if they do not then it causes much distress in the ego. Also, when your moral compass is being taught by delinquents who have not quite learned their own morality, your superego has inconsistencies. A child who is not safe and does not have their basic needs met loses pieces of their id. Turner (2009) explains that the process of feeling safe works on many subtle levels, and involves working out for oneself, in a nurturing environment, what our conscious awareness of existing, together with a sense of personal identity.

Friedman and Schustack 2009 write of Freud’s psychosexual stages and how they impact the development of personality. I sucked my thumb far later in childhood than I should have and still possess oral fixations. Perhaps my bed wetting was an indication that there was some psychological manifestation. My mother responded by sticking my face in urine until the habit retreated. I was meticulous but I was trained to be. I was sexually abused while in the phallic stage, causing much trauma that would follow me through the years and later quietly haunt my dreams. Yet, somehow I was a good kid and strived to achieve. I was quiet, reserved, and scared of shadows in the dark.

My environment was toxic by any standards and was viewable by others, which exposed me. Police raids, needles, mirrors and razors, visits to prisons, drug induced neighborhood spectacles, screaming, bruises, strange men, strange noises, overdoses, and sirens were not only the things that terrified me but they terrified the neighbors. People either felt pity or they were afraid drama and trauma was contagious, and that is what gossip was,...

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