State And Federal Systems Essay

840 words - 3 pages

In the United States of America there is not a single U.S. court system. Every State located in the U.S. has their own individual court system to handle the criminal and civil cases that are taken to court within the state. Outside of the State ran court systems there is the federal government court system. This court system is designed to try the cases that involve issues governed by the federal laws or the U.S. Constitution. The employment laws for both the state and federal court systems are also different. In this paper I will describe how the state and federal court systems of the government are different in their relation to employment law. I will also provide an example of employment protection that is provided by the state of California's court, but not the federal court.There are many different ways in which the state and federal courts systems differ. All 50 states located within the U.S. have their own judicial branch with an additional branch located in the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. The courts located at the state level handle ninety-five percent of cases brought to court in the United States. These cases involve disputes that happen under state laws. The organization of the court system is different form state to state. There are as many as fifty (50) different types of courts located within some states. The federal court system only handles approximately five percent of the court cases in the United States. Most cases brought before the federal court involve a violation of the United States Constitution, federal laws, or disputes over contracts or personal injuries involving U.S. citizens from different states and damages that exceed $75,000 (America's Court Systems, 2001).Federal and state court systems primarily have two different types of courts: appellate courts and trial courts. The difference between the two is that trial courts hear the original court cases, and the appellate courts hear only the appeals of cases. Most all state court cases begin in the trial court, which is where the case is filed and the evidence is presented. The trial court is where the case is presented before the jury or a single judge. In the trial courts, both the prosecution and the defense have the opportunity to present evidence and witnesses to support their side and the judge or jury make a decision on the case based on that evidence. Approximately ten percent of the civil and criminal cases filed in court ever...

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