Stereotypes And Stereotyping In A Tale Of Two Cities

710 words - 3 pages

Stereotypes in A Tale of Two Cities

 
     Charles Dickens stereotypes many of his Characters in A Tale of Two Cities. Among these stereotyped characters are The Marquis D' Evremond,

Lucy, and Miss Pross. These particular stereotypes were probably intentional,

for Dicken's was not a skilled writer. 

 

        The Marquis d' Evremond was probably intentionally stereotyped. His

character is basically used to represent the French Military of the time, so he

was as cruel, ignorant, and pompous as the French citizens were at that time.

His actions when his carriage runs over a child clearly show Dickens's

motive: to portray the French Military of the era as kind and generous

citizens, and to sort of justify the French Revolution. His dialogue with Miss

Pross early in the story also shows his contempt for the proletariat; furthering

his role as the stereotype of the Military. Just as he symbolizes the blood

spilled in the revolution, his birth symbolizes the fall of the Monarchy to

come.

 

        Lucy's stereotyping was perhaps unintentional. Civil view  of women has

been only until recently, and even currently, congruent with that which he

used in his book. Lucy was a very stereotypical, dumb, Victorian-age woman.

Her dialogue throughout the story is the main indicator of the fact that she is

stereotyped, but also that she does not play an active role in the plot: She is a

prominent figure in the story-line, but she never really DOES anything. This

was consistent with the views of that period; the wife would be an important

factor in the husband's life, but she really wouldn't DO anything. But

Possibly, Dickens may have been above this, but realized that she would be a

more believable and acceptable character if he portrayed her as he did. 

However, when Lucy was struck down by the cruel and inhumane Marquis,

and his close friend Dansker, her importance is emphasized by her final

quote, "Marquis, I love...

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