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"Streetcar Named Desire" By Tennessee Williams.

1622 words - 6 pages

The first scene I am looking at is Scene nine, in which Mitch confronts Blanche aboutthe lies she has been telling him regarding her past. It is clear that it was Blanche'schoice to tell the lies, so in that respect the following problems are her own fault.However, Williams may have aimed to look closely at Blanche's character to see whyshe lied, and by justifying herself, she appears a tragic self absorbed failure, not acynical manipulator. Blanche is described as having a 'tense , hunched position',which shows her obvious unease, and worry. She is dressed in 'scarlet', a provocativecolour, but also symbolic of danger. Blanche is becoming lost in her memories, as shehears the 'Varsouviana' in her head as she drinks. William's tries to justify Blanche'salcoholism, 'she is drinking to escape it, [the past], and the sense of disaster'.Blanche is depicted as incredibly excited to see Mitch, she 'rushes aroundfrantically, she is so excited her breath is audible'. There is something touching aboutthe way Blanche is happy to see Mitch although the irony is that he no longer lovesher. She endeavours to be good to him, although he is being deliberately cold to her,she calls him 'beautiful', and a 'dumb angelpuss', and is eager to please. She enquiresafter his mother, and tells him that she still likes him, 'I forgive you because it's such arelief to se you' she tells him. Blanche tries to keep up the pretence of being puresaying that she doesn't' know what she has just been drinking, 'What is that I wonder?'.Blanche is shocked by Mitch's accusation that Blanche has been drinking all ofStanley' liquor, and responds somewhat haughtily, 'I won't descend t the level of suchcheap accusations to answer them even'. She is trying to reassert herself as a lady, butthis is wasted on Mitch.Blanche tells Mitch that she likes the dark, 'the dark is comforting to me',which reinforces the idea of her being a moth. Also, she shows a fear of the light,and tells Mitch that she doesn't want realism. Blanche attempts to justify herself toMitch, but to no avail. She tells him,'I don't tell the truth, I tell what ought to be true' , and 'Don't turn the light on!'.Blanche is desperate for Mitch to keep his illusions about her, she wants him to seeher as she thinks he should, not as how she is. This desperate reasoning evokessympathy in the audience, and perhaps Blanche has good motives for her lies. Mitch,however can not see this, he says , 'I was a fool'. Blanche tries to explain her past toMitch, 'intimacies with strangers were all I seemed able to fill my empty heart with'she claims, and begs him to love her, 'You said you needed somebody well I neededsomebody too'. Mitch remains unmoved, as he is like Stanley, he cannot understandBlanche, 'You lied to me' he states.Blanche tells Mitch that she didn't really lie, 'Never inside, I didn't lie in myheart' she pleads. A Mexican woman appears outside, calling 'flores para los muertos',which roughly translates as flowers for the...

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