This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Style And Content Of The Red Room And The Judge's House

2867 words - 11 pages

Style and Content of The Red Room and The Judge's House

Using reference to style and content I will explain how and why these
two short stories are typical 19th century stories. The two short
stories that we have read, ' The Red Room' by H.G. Wells and 'The
Judges House' by Bram Stoker, are heavily concerned with the
supernatural world, with people in the Victorian era preoccupied with
ghosts.

When Darwin wrote his book 'The Origin of Species' this hugely
questioned Christian beliefs. People were no longer sure of religion,
and became very superstitious, with Ghost stories became very popular.
They had always thought god came first; now science was starting to
take over. In the 19th century people were unsure about what was real
in the world. The Victorians did not know what to believe about in
their world and spirituality. The Victorians liked supernatural
stories and short stories were very popular as most people were
working so these stories could be read easily and quickly. There were
a lot of supernatural stories around this time, and we saw the rise in
prominence of the gothic story.

A gothic story is a type of romantic fiction that predominated in
English Literature in the last third of the 18th century and the first
two decades of the 19th century. The setting for this type of story
was usually a ruined Gothic castle or abbey. The Gothic novel, or
Gothic romance, emphasized mystery and horror and was filled with
ghost-haunted rooms, underground passages and secret stairways. You
don't tend to see this type of story anymore and the popularity that
they enjoyed decades ago seems to be waning.

With the two stories, they have many similarities with a typical
gothic mystery novel. The setting for a gothic story is normally some
sort of haunted room or house. This pattern can also be seen in the
two stories examined here. Both The Red Room and The Judge's House are
set in locations generic to Gothic Literature. The Judge's House is
set in a neglected old house, where nobody dare live; and the red room
involves a dark, mysterious and allegedly haunted old room in a
disused wing of a castle. These settings are typical of Gothic and
Victorian ghost stories. People who neglected their own welfare and
were regarded as morally corrupt often-inhabited dilapidated and
derelict buildings. The nocturnal setting contributes to the spooky
atmosphere that the writers are trying to create.

The old people who inhabit The Lorraine Castle cannot use most of it
to live in because they are afraid of the 'red room'. This keeps them
well away from that section of the castle. A castle is an appropriate
location and here what we do not know is far more frightening than
what we do know. The journey to the red room, serves to build up
mystery and suspense, with long corridors and spiral...

Find Another Essay On Style and Content of The Red Room and The Judge's House

Comparison of The Red Room, The Signalman and The Ostler

3766 words - 15 pages Comparison of The Red Room, The Signalman and The Ostler A gothic story is a type of romantic fiction that existed in English Literature in the last third of the 18th century and the first two decades of the 19th century, the setting for which was usually a ruined gothic castle of Abbey. The gothic novel or gothic romance emphasised mystery and horror and was filled with ghost haunting rooms, underground passages, and

Comparison of The Red Room and The Signalman

896 words - 4 pages Signalman' the events are witnessed by the narrator while they actually happen to the Signalman. Both narrators seem to be well-educated, scientific men, which is typical of victorian times. Neither of them seems willing to believe in the supernatural. In 'The Red Room' the narrator does not believe the warnings of the inhabitants of the house concerning the supernatural content of the room, his over- confident belief in science makes

A Comparison of The Signalman and The Red Room

1375 words - 6 pages A Comparison of The Signalman and The Red Room The Signalman and the Red Room are well known examples of nineteenth century ghost stories. Write a critical comparison of these two stories. What do you consider to be their strengths and which of the stories do you enjoy the most. Charles Dickens and H.G. Wells were both living during the Victorian era. The many radical changes in this era tainted their writing. Both

A Comparison of The Red Room and The Signalman

889 words - 4 pages A Comparison Between The Red Room and The Signalman These two stories, though different, have in common their writers intentions which is to keep the reader in suspense. We can see this in many places in the stories, and an example of this relates to the settings and surroundings throughout. The Victorians were very interested in Gothic Literature and this is shown especially in the ‘Red Room’, where Wells borrowed applications such as

Comparing The Red Room and The Landlady

811 words - 3 pages seems very strange. Billy asks the landlady about the parrot and the dog which seem alive but are not. She explains that they were once alive. Billy just keeps drinking his tea which he thinks tastes like bitter almonds. Billy asks her about her place and she explains to him that there have only been three guests at the bed and breakfast including him. I think the title The Red Room makes me think of a horrible room filled with evil

The Monkey's Paw and The Red Room

6755 words - 27 pages The Monkey's Paw and The Red Room During the time of the 19th century that "The Monkey's Paw" and "The Red Room" were written, many unusual events occurred and which could not be answered or explained because science and human minds had not developed enough to answer questions or prove any unusual events that occurred. The society would try to come up with answers and explanations to the paranormal events that occurred

The Red Room and The Signalman

2977 words - 12 pages the directions, but when the man attempts to repeat the directions back to him, he makes mistakes and so the man with the withered arm "corrected in one particular". This shows that the directions to the red room are so long that a normal mind couldn't possibly remember them all. The author uses this technique of making the mansion big to make it seem easy to get lost. Also to emphasise how big the house is he uses mirrors, "queer old

H.G. Wells: ‘The Red Room’ and ‘The Cone’

1604 words - 6 pages H.G. Wells: ‘The Red Room’ and ‘The Cone’ The short stories ‘The Red Room’ and ‘The Cone’ by HG Wells both heavily feature tension and suspense. The author of the two stories, HG Wells, uses a number of techniques to create this mood and atmosphere to keep his readers interested. HG Wells immediately creates an air of mystery from the outset of ‘The Red Room’ when he introduces the ‘man with the withered arm’. This

The Red Room and The Cone by H.G. Wells

1053 words - 4 pages The Red Room and The Cone by H.G. Wells Both stories are Gothic mystery stories and were written around the late eighteenth century to the early nineteenth century. These sorts of stories usually have a setting of a dark, abandoned and scary place. The Red Room is about a young man who visits a castle and feels he must spend a night in a mysterious room that is suspected to be haunted. The Cone is about a woman having an affair with

The Use of Language in The Red Room and The Signalman

2221 words - 9 pages because he says to this to the old people. The stories are different as they are set in different places ; one is at the railway station and the other is in a ‘haunted’ house. The reader is not told exactly where the red room is but we know that it is in a haunted area. Also the stories are different because something different happened in both of them. In one death occurs however in the other the most that happened is that the unfrigtenable

The Signalman and the Red Room are well known examples of nineteenth

639 words - 3 pages believes in what he can touch and see and he when the old people warn him about the red room he interprets a belief that they were trying to enhance the spiritual terrors of the house. The pace of this story is very quick into the supernatural part as in the first line says, "it will take a very tangible ghost to frighten me." And then soon after that the narrator set of to the red room, which is haunted. Both stories are set in dark

Similar Essays

Comparison Of The Red Room And Farthing House

1948 words - 8 pages Comparison of The Red Room and Farthing House 'The Red Room' and 'Farthing House' are both ghost stories and fit into the Gothic mysteries. Red Room and Farthing House are written by different authors, at different times. Farthing House was written in the 20th centaury and uses more modern language. Red Room was written in the

Comparison Of Two Short Stories: The Red Room And Farthing House

2267 words - 9 pages Comparison of Two Short Stories: the Red Room and Farthing House I have been asked to compare two short stories for my English coursework. These two stories are called "The Red room" and "Farthing House". These stories are considerably different, partly because of the respective eras during which they were written. "Farthing House" was written by a female author, Susan Hill in 1992, while "The Red Room" was written by

Compare H.G. Wells' The Red Room And Farthing House By Susan Hill

1546 words - 6 pages Compare H.G. Wells' The Red Room and Farthing House by Susan Hill "There was no mistake about it. The flame vanished, as if the wick had been suddenly nipped between a finger and thumb, leaving the wick neither glowing or smoking, but black." Ghost stories use dark and fear of it as a key element, and most occurrences happen in the night, and/or in the dark. The aim of this essay is to compare and contrast the two short stories

An Analysis Of The Judge's House

1713 words - 7 pages following quotation," ….Malcomson could not see at what part of the room the rat disappeared, for the green shade of his lamp left the upper part of the room in darkness and the fire had burned low." Darkness is a sign of evil and this portrays horror, and also the colour is firelight is an emblem of danger and hazard. There is a great sense of ambiguity shown in "The Judge's House". This is an absolute essential in