Sue Monk Kidd: Imprints In The Mind Of A Writer

893 words - 4 pages

What would it be like to live in the south during the 1960’s? How about to live with bees? Sue Mont Kidd got to encounter both of these things while pursuing her innate talent to write. Her childhood memories and ambitions, experiences with bees, and the social climate of the south left an imprint on Sue Monk Kidd, as evident in the coming-of-age novel The Secret Life of Bee.
Kidd’s childhood memories and ambitions took a toll on her novel The Secret Life of Bees. Lily and Kidd had many minute similarities, but they were the kinds of things that you would remember about your childhood. They both had nannies, curled their hair with grape juice cans, grew up in the south, and refused to eat ...view middle of the document...

Another Experience Kidd had with bees was their sound, their very distinct and soothing buzz. “…making that propeller sound, a high-pitched zzzzzz that hummed along my skin” (Kidd 1) and “During the day I hear them tunneling through the walls of my bedroom, sounding like a radio tuned to a static in the next room…” (Kidd 1) where two things wrote in which I feel showed her remembrance of the times when she would listen to the relaxing buzz of the bees. Her experience with bees was the basis of the story, found on the very first page.
The most influential part of Kidd’s life would be the time and place in which she grew up. Kidd grew up in the south during the time of Civil Rights. Kidd actually wrote “’Today, July second, 1964,’ he said, ‘the president of the United States signed the Civil Rights Act into law…’” (Kidd 20), which I am sure was one of the most memorable days of her life. Blacks were not treated fairly in the days that Kidd grew up. The got jailed for unfair reasons and beat for no reason, just because they were black. “That’s when the dealer lifted the flashlight over his head, then down, smashing it into Rosaleen’s forehead. She dropped it her knees” (Kidd 180) was written to show the unbelievable and unjust attacks that occurred on blacks. “I watched the policeman put Zach and the other three boys in his...

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