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Summary Of A Room Of Ones Own By Virginia Woolf And Sexism In This Century

720 words - 3 pages

In her book A Room of Ones Own, Virginia Woolf provides a graphic portrait of sexism in the early 1900s. Since then our society has allowed almost all the same equal opportunity to women as men. The only restriction that comes to mind that women still have today is women aren't permitted to become priests. Our society has come a long way since the release of Woolf's book and I think that she would feel proud and accomplished of contemporary attitudes toward women if she were alive today.Over the century's restriction on women have been lessened. Women are now permitted to enter almost any profession. They are protected from discrimination by civil rights laws in many states. The two notable exceptions are that some combat assignments within the Armed Forces are still restricted to men only and women are prohibited from positions of authority within many religious organizations.In recent decades, discrimination against individuals on a basis of gender has ...view middle of the document...

They feel that their stance is not driven by a desire to oppress women; rather, they devoutly feel that the Bible does not authorize their denomination to ordain women.The United States as numerous civil rights laws at the federal, state and local level against sexism in religion. But most include a clause that allows religious groups to freely discriminate against men or women. Denomination can refuse to ordain women and also refuse to hire women as staff. The establishment clause of the First Amendment guarantees unusual freedom for religious institutions to discriminate in their selection of employee's freedom that is not allowed to other employees.There are several reasons why women are restricted to some combat assignments in the Armed Forces. The military believes that women don't have the physical or mental ability to carry the assignments. Some men believe that women are weak, too delicate and too small. But recent movements have been trying to change this. The problem is, if new "direct combat" jobs are open to women, will this negatively affect our combat readiness and combat effectiveness. ???????????????????????Although women are allowed the same opportunity as men and are considered equal I think in some instances women our still thought not to be fit for certain jobs. For instance some men find it very intimidating to have a women cop, correctional officer or construction worker. It is illegal to not hire someone because of their gender but some men feel threatened by women in some instances. Women might find themselves putting up with a lot of harassment and jokes from men especially in these specific jobs. I think the more women who have jobs such as these ones the easier the men find to deal with it.The issues on sexism have changed. Its not a person's gender that is considered when being hired for a job like it was in the 1900s. In today's society it's the person's intelligence, experience and ability weather male or female that will determine if they are fit for the job. In the 1900s women couldn't even have jobs and if they did they were very limited.I think that Virginia Woolf would feel proud and accomplished the comtemporary attitudes toward women if she were alive today.

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