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Survival Of The Fittest: Exploitation Of Cambodia Under The Khmer Rouge

1259 words - 5 pages

Slavery has existed throughout history and it even exists today in various forms. Slavery is the imprisonment of an individual by another. Herbert Spencer proposed the idea of survival of the fittest in human society. With slavery, especially in today’s time, there are people who are socially stronger taking advantage of those who are weaker and more vulnerable. The societies of today view money as a form of power, and with this power it is used to entrap the weak and using them as disposable objects. One of the forms of slavery that exist today but goes unnoticed is human trafficking. Somaly Mam’s autobiography, The Road of Lost Innocence, gave her readers an inside look into her world as a sex slave in Cambodia. Throughout her book, she describes the cruel and awful things slaves experience throughout their slavery. Sex slaves and violence are persistent in societies around the world, especially in the Cambodian society, because of the lack of respect and morals and the disconnection between the people with in that society.
Cambodia is one of the poorest countries in Southern Asia. Cambodia’s poverty is causing a lot issues within the country; two of these issues are crime and enslavement. The citizens of that society are working hard and are receiving little to no pay. The damage that the Khmer Rouge has done to Cambodia has left the people emotionally and physically scarred. In Mam’s book she talks a lot about the effects that the Khmer Rouge had on the people and her country. Her words painted a picture for her readers showing the way people acted towards one another due to the Khmer Rouge. For example, she states, “It was important not to see, not to hear, not to know anything about what was happening” (Mam 14). Mam is explaining that of all the murders and starvation that the Cambodians have experienced living under the Khmer Rouge has caused everyone to not interact with each other to a certain extent, they all looked out for themselves. As a result of these actions a lot of the injustice that took place happened because no one had it within themselves to fight for justice. The Cambodian society was able to live under the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy because of the feared that were instilled in from the violence they lived through for several years. The mass murders that took place resulted in individuals only looking out themselves; they no longer trust each other. Without trust there is no relationship and without a relationship there is no connection.
A country where its people are not united will ultimately fail; because no one is willing to work together in order to solve issues that arise. In Cambodia issues such as human trafficking are not being fully acknowledged because people are still fearful of having their own thoughts and challenging injustice. In Barbara Crossette’s article, In Cambodia, a Middle Classless Society, Crossette quotes Frank Calzon,
“People who thought differently were called worms, dogs,...

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