Sylvia Plath Essay

2003 words - 8 pages

In your introduction there needs to be a balance between relevant biographical background (especially that which links the two poets), writing style and introduce the specific poems you will be drawing from in the construction of your argument.The poetry of Sylvia Plath and Bruce Dawe differ considerably in style, context and language. Bruce Dawe is the one contemporary poet who is genuinely literary and genuinely popular. He writes about matters of social, political, and cultural interest to the great middle mass of the Australian population. He is almost the first poet to recognise that the typical Australian as person who lives neither in the country nor in the centre of a metropolis, but in one of the sprawling suburbs that grow and grow outward from the cities. Dawe writes about people who are vulnerable and easily hurt, and has an instinctive sympathises with them. Their injuries and tragedies are documented from a point of view that can feel their injury but stand just far enough away from it to undertake successfully the task of recording it without overstating or sentimentalising it. Dawe is a bystander, helpless in so far as he cannot enter the tragedy or avert it, but helpful in so far as he can record it and reveal its nature to others. On the other hand, Sylvia Plath explores the emotions and feelings of her own life experience through her poems. Her poetry reflects the pivotal moments in her life that are often misinterpreted by readers as ambiguous and vague. Plath's poetry although being autobiographical, hints in allowing her self-identity to reveal a sense of inspiration to her readers without confronting the obstacle of society. By analysing the anti-war poem, "˜Homecoming' of Bruce Dawe, and the meditating poem, "˜The arrival of the beebox,' of Sylvia Plath, the mentioned qualities of both poets will be recognised. Bruce Dawe and Sylvia Plath employ a range of poetic devices in their poems "˜Homecoming' and "˜The arrival of the beebox' respectively, that distinguish Dawe as the poet of the people and Plath as an enigma.While Dawe completed his RAAF service, in 1968, the United States and South Vietnamese troops in Vietnam began to suffer heavy casualties at the hands of the National Liberation Front Army (the Viet Cong) and the North Vietnamese who launched a series of major attacks known as the Tet offensive. Australian troops were fighting alongside the Americans and they also suffered heavy losses. Dawe has said that he was gripped by two items in the American weekly news magazine Newsweek (ETAN, 1980). One was a front colour cover showing a US tank returning to base with dead and dying soldiers draped over it. The other was a report of arrangements at Oakland Airforce Base in California for transport planes to take of with fresh loads of troops for Vietnam and to return with dead bodies. The poet wrote "˜homecoming' when the fighting was at its heaviest and the casualty rate on the American side...

Find Another Essay On Sylvia Plath

Sylvia Plath Essay

1341 words - 6 pages You might be pondering on whom I might be? I am he, the creation of Sylvia Plath. I am the persona and the protagonist of the poem, ‘Insomniac’. This poem was written in May 1961, four months after the miscarriage. During this period, Plath was diagnosed with acute insomnia and was pregnant. The elapsed time of this poem is from darkness to daylight respectively to each stanza. It can be said that this period from darkness to daylight is a

Sylvia Plath Essay

1326 words - 6 pages “If you expect nothing from anybody, you’re never disappointed” (Plath 20), are the insightful words of the adept dramatist Sylvia Plath. Sylvia’s formidable experiences as an adolescences and her vexing run-ins with others have shaped and molded her literature. Sylvia’s praise is not only well deserved but is proven by each and every one of her impassioned poems about the human condition. The struggle of everyday life is shed in a unique

Sylvia Plath

1714 words - 7 pages Sylvia Plath was a troubled writer to say the least, not only did she endure the loss of her father a young age but she later on “attempted suicide at her home and was hospitalized, where she underwent psychiatric treatment” for her depression (Dunn). Writing primarily as a poet, she only ever wrote a single novel, The Bell Jar. This fictional autobiography “[chronicles] the circumstances of her mental collapse and subsequent suicide attempt

Biography of Sylvia Plath

1245 words - 5 pages As one of the most multitalented writers of the twentieth century, Sylvia Plath was highly esteemed by fans and fellow writers alike. Sylvia Plath’s parents, Aurelia Schober and Otto Plath, had met when Aurelia became Otto’s student at Boston University. Otto was a biology professor with an infatuation with bees; he had even published a book titled Bumblebees and their ways. Otto and Aurelia married in January of 1932, and by October of the same

Sylvia Plath: Deep Depression

747 words - 3 pages Poetry is the wind for a trapped and wounded soul. A great example of a wounded soul is, Sylvia Plath. She was an immaculate poet, who expressed her personal troubles through writing. As Plath’s life smouldered into a heap of dust at the age of 30, her poetry grew and bloomed. In the years before her death, her most troubled period, Plath penned three of her most well-known poems, “Daddy”, “Lady Lazarus” and “Tulips”—all three illustrating the

Sylvia Plath: A Poet

783 words - 4 pages Sylvia Plath was born on October 27, 1932 in Boston, Massachusetts. Plath’s mom met her soul mate while she was a master’s student at Boston University. Sylvia’s mom’s name was Aurelia Schober, and her dad’s name was Otto Plath. When Sylvia was only 8 years old, her father died from problems with diabetes. Her father was very strict and mean. Sylvia’s father’s death and strict authority was the reason for all her poems and stories. She

Sylvia Plath Essay

1210 words - 5 pages It can be observed through research that Sylvia Plath was the average 1960's housewife on the outside but on the inside she struggled with her husband and many other things such as her social life and goals that were set out for woman to do. Sylvia Plath was born in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. She published her first poem when she was only eight years of age. During her collage years she was a very popular and social young woman with both male

Biography of Sylvia Plath

1678 words - 7 pages Critical Analysis Sylvia Plath, a great American author, focuses mostly on actual experiences. Plath’s poetry displays feelings and emotions. Plath had the ability to transform everyday happenings into poems or diary entries. Plath had a passion for poetry and her work was valued. She was inspired by novelists and her own skills. Her poetry was also very important to readers and critics. Sylvia Plath’s work shows change throughout her lifetime

Confessions of Sylvia Plath

1143 words - 5 pages sort. Living with Ted Hughes, Plath would use a Ouija board to ask questions such as the title of their next poem or the name of their children. She would constantly refer to the spirit within the board as Pan whose “family god was named ‘Kolossus’” which shared a name with her later written poem “The Colossus” (Sylvia Plath's Spirit Guide). The use of the board was never seen as out of the norm in her daily life as Ted Hughes and visitors would

Sylvia Plath - Ariel

568 words - 2 pages have found a strong connection with Sylvia Plath and her writing style and themes. In the upcoming poems I included I will try and display the same passion and simplicity Plath showed to convey such strong and powerful emotions.Depression seemed to be a constant companion throughout Plath's life. She attempted suicide two times in a span of twenty years and failed. At the age of thirty, her third try at suicide was a success. A poem like Lady

Biography of Sylvia Plath

692 words - 3 pages Sylvia Plath lived in a time where once a woman got married, she was expected to drop all of her career ambitions and become a housewife for her husband. A young woman was expected to marry a rich and successful man, even if she did not really love him. Everything a woman did was for status in society. Plath, often regarded now as a feminist, had faced these problems in her own life and they had even caused her to become clinically depressed

Similar Essays

Sylvia Plath Essay

975 words - 4 pages Sylvia Plath's life, like her manic depression, constantly jumped between Heaven and Hell. Her seemingly perfect exterior hid a turbulent and deeply troubled spirit. A closer look at her childhood and personal experiences removes some element of mystery from her writings.One central character to Sylvia Plath's poems is her father, Professor Otto Emile Plath. Otto Plath was diabetic and refused to stay away from foods restricted by his doctor. As

Sylvia Plath Essay 1458 Words

1458 words - 6 pages "To a great extent the myth has been fed by feminist fuel and reams have been written about Plath, the super-achiever who fell victim to both the repressions of the woman's role and society's willingness to constrain female artists," said Carol Bere of Plath in her essay "Letters Home: Correspondence 1850-1963" (Wagner 59). Indeed, the previous quote is quite an accurate summary of the poet Sylvia Plath. Plath was born in

Sylvia Plath Essay 998 Words

998 words - 4 pages Sylvia Plath is said to be one the most prodigious, yet interesting, confessional poets of her time. She was an extremely vital poet of the post-World War II time period and expressed her feelings towards her father and husband through her poetry. Plath’s mental illness had a dramatic influence upon her work in which she demonstrated the hatred she had for her father specifically. The poem “Daddy” is an easily applicable example. Within

Sylvia Plath Essay

2103 words - 8 pages Sylvia Plath was a gifted writer, poet and verbal artist whose personal anguish and torment visibly manifested itself in her work. Much of her angst stems from her warped relationship with her father. Other factors that influenced her works were her strained views of human sexuality, her sado-masochistic tendencies, self-hatred and her traditional upbringing. She was labeled as a confessional poet and biographical and historical material is