This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Symbolism And Theme In "The Giver."

862 words - 3 pages

Symbolism and themes are difficult to infer in a text, but understanding these literary elements makes the book more interesting and entertaining for the reader. Symbolism is defined using a concrete word, object, color, picture, name and so forth to strand for a name, abstract idea, image, or event. For example a heart could stand for love and an American flag as freedom or patriotism. Theme could be defined as a meaning moral or main message the writer is trying to tell you or the reader about the story. Theme is usually the "life lesson" or provide to human nature. Lois Lowery's "The Giver" contains symbolism and a powerful theme that makes the book more appealing to the reader.Much symbolism in "The Giver" centers on the community and its rituals. The society with all of its rules and regulations, symbolizes the sameness, the interdependence, and longing for perfection of its members. For example when the children are given to the family unit in the naming ceremony it symbolizes that they are accepted into the community and becomes apart of the community by being given a name. Another example of symbolism is the pills that the people have to take when they start having feelings for the opposite sex. This symbolizes maturity because of the attraction and need to take the pills but then it symbolizes the control of the committee of elders that are making them take these pills so that they have no personal feelings what so ever.The character names in "The Giver" are also symbolic, often highlighting their personalities, qualities, and actions. For example, Jonas means accomplishing. Jonas is also a biblical character who warns his town of the wickedness and that is what Jonas does in this story. Once he realizes the wickedness, happening in his own community (like with the releases), he leaves the community and then they experience pain which only he had experienced. Jonas wanted them to experience the true feelings of life. He symbolizes the need for change in the society. He almost is a David like larger-than-life character (David and Goliath) who is the least likely to overcome the all mighty and powerful opponent or society. Jonas's family "adopts" a newborn named Gabriel, another important person in this story. Gabriel symbolizes hope for the future. Gabriel is an angel sent from heaven when to tell Mary that she was pregnant with her...

Find Another Essay On Symbolism and Theme in "The Giver."

Themes in The Giver Essay

722 words - 3 pages A true utopia requires sacrifices many people cannot condone. This fact has been shown throughout The Giver. The community decides to sacrifice many things to come to Sameness. Pain, individuality and love are among many things that they have sacrificed (Lowry 124). These sacrifices made the community Jonas lived in seemingly perfect; there is no hunger, no war, no pain, no one will ever be alone. But, a perfect community is completely

Jonas and the Giver Essay

723 words - 3 pages One of the first things Jonas notices about the Giver is that he seems somewhat set apart from everybody else. In the novel, the author writes “…and the Chief Elder’s eyes were now on the one who sat in the midst but seemed oddly separate from them. It was a man Jonas had never noticed before, a bearded man with pale eyes. He was watching Jonas intently. (Lowry 60-61)” The next day, when Jonas has to report for training, he meets the Giver and

Symbolism and Theme in "The Lesson" by Toni Cade Bambara 1972

994 words - 4 pages The Lesson is considered by the Literary Canon to be a wonderful work of fiction because of its use of language, humanistic theme, symbolism, and non-genre plot. Two essential elements that add to the depth and enhance a reader's comprehension of The Lesson are Bambara's use of symbolism and theme. The Lesson takes place in New York's inner city. The fictional story begins with a group of poor, uneducated, lower class city kids standing in front

Freedom And The Giver

995 words - 4 pages The Not-So Free Society The author of The Giver, Louis Lowry, imagines a society where individuality is strictly curbed and conformity is rigidly enforced. The citizens in this nameless society have been stripped of the rights to self-determination. All decisions, both personal and professional, are left to the governing council. Individuality and all its accompanying emotions, both painful and pleasurable, have been sacrificed for societal

Theme, Symbolism, and Irony in The Works of J. M. Barrie

2991 words - 12 pages James Matthew Barrie, an author and playwright, is well-known for his works (Markgraf). It could be assumed that someone who wrote works so full of imagination and creativity would have the greatest amount of happiness. This idea is not true in the case of Barrie, but even though he faced such tragedy, his works are still mostly cheerful. James Matthew Barrie’s strong themes combined with deep symbolism and irony mesh together in his books and

Symbolism and Theme in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily

1472 words - 6 pages Symbolism and Theme in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily    In William Faulkner's short story "A Rose for Emily," a series of interconnected events collectively represent a single theme in the story. Symbolism is the integral factor involved in understanding the theme. "A Rose for Emily's" dominant theme is the search for love and security, a basic human need which can be met unfavorably in equivocal environments. Faulkner's use of

Symbolism that Represents the Theme of Corruption in Shakespeare's MacBeth

1034 words - 4 pages Symbolism in MacBeth Symbolism plays an important role to emphasize the theme of corruption of power in William Shakespeare's Macbeth. Throughout the play there are several main symbols repeatedly used to emphasize this theme. The contrast of light and dark representing good and evil, blood representing guilt, murder, and pain, and the archetypal pattern of purification by using water represents removal of guilt, cleansing and peace. Symbolism

Comparing In Our World and the World of The Giver

805 words - 3 pages Parallels In Our World and the World of The Giver     The story in The Giver by Lois Lowry takes place in a community that is not normal. People cannot see color, it is an offense for somebody to touch others, and the community assigns people jobs and children. This unnamed community shown through Jonas’ eye, the main character in this novel, is a perfect society. There is no war, crime, and hunger. Most readers might take it for granted

Language and Three words in Lois Lowry’s The Giver

965 words - 4 pages Language is a tool to communicate with others, convey your ideas and meanings. Precise language is important because it can help you exchange ideas with others more efficiently without any chance of being misunderstood. Sometimes, different words are used to conceal the true meaning of the idea or action, such as passing away implicating death. In Lois Lowry’s “The Giver”, people living in the community are taught to use precise language to

Freedom and Individuality in The Giver by Lois Lowry

1759 words - 7 pages . Some novels hope to instill this belief through the use of a dystopian society. One such novel tells the story of a young man named Jonas, who gains wisdom through a man called the Giver, who transmits memories of the past to him in order to bring about some change in their dysfunctional society. In The Giver, Lois Lowry utilizes a dystopian setting to stress the importance of feeling and individuality over apathy and sameness. Lowry’s

This essay outlines the similarities in theme, symbolism and writing structure between William Shakespear's "Hamlet" and Sophocles "Oedipus King"

877 words - 4 pages . Sophocles Oedipus King and Shakespeare's Hamlet both contain the basic elements of tragedy, although the Shakespearean tragedy expanded its setting far beyond that of the ancient Greek tragedy.The theme of the tormented king is perhaps the strongest comparison between Hamlet and Oedipus King. In Hamlet, Shakespeare establishes the theme of torment early in the play with the arrival of the ghost of Hamlet's murdered father, the former King of

Similar Essays

The Scarlet Ibis Symbolism And Theme Review

862 words - 3 pages "knot of cruelty borne by love, much as blood sometimes bears the seed of our destruction..." Blood. There's the scarlet again. This story is red. From Doodle's vermilion neck to the red leaves of the bleeding tree. Red, red, and more RED. When Doodle tries to crawl...what color does he turn? RED. What color is he at birth? That's right. RED. What color is his coffin? Mahogany, a shade of red. "Hope no longer hid in the dark palmetto thicket but

Comparing Theme And Symbolism Essay

858 words - 3 pages Described as "a thoroughly chilling and unsettling story" (Porter), The Lottery was written by Shirley Jackson in 1948. In a letter to poet Howard Nemerov, she wrote, "...I have always loved to use fear...I delight in what I fear" (Guran).James Joyce was "born into a well-off Catholic family in Dublin, Ireland" (Barger). He later rejected Catholicism in favor of literature (Barger).Theme and symbolism are prevalent in the writings of both these

Symbolism And The Theme Of Incest In &Quot;The Fall Of The House Of Usher&Quot;

776 words - 3 pages the incest. The house would be perfect without the crack in it, and the brother and sister pair would be perfect without the incest that created them. Edgar Allan Poe uses symbolism and the incestuous theme throughout the story to reveal his character flaws, future events, and to help us, the reader, understand the events that occur. Everything that happened in the story was in some way or another symbolizing the very apparent theme of incest and the way the family was connected to the house.

The Theme Of Estrangement, Feminism And The Use Of Symbolism In Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing

1471 words - 6 pages Palacký UniversityFaculty of PhilosophyEnglish PhilologyThe Theme of Estrangement, Feminism and the Use of Symbolism in Margaret Atwood's SurfacingKAA/CS00Ondřej Andrle11th May 2014 The goal of this essay is to highlight a variety of themes in the novel Surfacing, as well as show the influence of Canada's cultural and geographic values on this book. The novel, presents notions of national and gendered identity, and stirred up