This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Sympathy For Pip In Dickens' Great Expectations

3828 words - 15 pages

Sympathy for Pip in Charles Dickens' Great Expectations

The settings of Great Expectations have an important bearing on the
storyline; the settings also echo the characters in personality and
circumstance. The theme of the book seems to run parallel with the
settings in some respects, such as the plain but wholesome life-style
of Rochesterand the beckoning but ultimately shallow habitat of London.
Throughout the book comparisons and relationships between story and
setting are made, many subtle and not evident unless reflected upon.

In chapters 1 and 8, Dickens generates a lot of sympathy for Pip. His
writing techniques are very effective and creative as he manages to
relate certain locations with depressing and cold images like prisons
creating that 'fear' factor for Pip.

The setting from the start of the book is very important, from the
bleak and stereotypical graveyard that give the story a starting tense
and exiting mood, and the humble blacksmiths that acts as a platform
for Pip's expectations and the opposite setting to much of the grander
scenery in London. The graveyard at the start of the book is typical
example of how the setting contributes so well to the story and the
atmosphere; this is just one of the more obvious examples. The first
chapter we see pip in the graveyard while being told background
information which will create sympathy straight away.

Pirip who is nicknamed Pip for the childlike factor, is an orphan who
lives with his sister, Mrs Joe Gargery who is the only family he has
left, the effect of the nickname is to give the readers an insight
into how big this situation is, as it clearly informs the reader that
Pip is only a child in such a dangerous setting and situation, this is
done purely for tension.

He explains his unusual change of name in the sentence; "my infant
tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than
Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip," Dickens uses
repetition on the word Pip in this sentence and this emphasises that
his name is PIP, nothing more, and nothing less than Pip. The simple
language Pip uses and the way he has decided to spell his name could
show Pips simple existence.

His parents have passed away and so did the rest of the family, this
was due to the short life expectancy back in the 1800's as only the
high class could afford medicine. Dickens then tells you how pip is
constantly thinking of his parents and that the memories will always
stay with him,

"My first fancies regarding what they were like, were unreasonably
derived from their tombstones. The shape of the letters on my fathers,
gave me an odd idea that he was a square, stout, dark man, with curly
black hair", he describes how Pip pictures his parents in his mind,
memories of his parents is all he has left,...

Find Another Essay On Sympathy for Pip in Dickens' Great Expectations

How Dickens Creates Sympathy for the Characters in Great Expectations

1099 words - 4 pages How Dickens Creates Sympathy for the Characters in Great Expectations Published initially as a weekly contribution in a local newspaper, Dickens’ Great Expectations developed to be a great success. Great Expectations was a story for all classes, both rich and poor appreciated his efforts. Great Expectations is the tale of Phillip Pirrip who has no family except an older sister, he feels insecure in the world around him. Having no

Dickens' Creation of Sympathy for His Characters in Great Expectations

3213 words - 13 pages Dickens' Creation of Sympathy for His Characters in Great Expectations Charles Dickens was born on February 7th 1812, the son of John and Elizabeth Dickens. John Dickens was a clerk in the naval pay office. He had a poor head for finances and in 1824 found himself imprisoned for debt. His wife and children (with the exception of Charles) were, as was normal, imprisoned with him. Charles was put to work at Warren's

How does Charles Dickens Create Sympathy for Pip, Magwitch and Miss Havisham in Great Expectation?

1397 words - 6 pages Great Expectations Great Expectations By reading and analyzing the two extracts of "Great Expectations", this essay will be used to explore the devices that dickens uses to create sympathy for the three key characters in the novel: Pip, Magwitch and Miss Havisham. The first extract that will be focused on is when Pip is in the Churchyard, at the beginning of the novel at which he meets Magwitch for the first time. The

Feeling Sorry for Pip in Great Expectations

1137 words - 5 pages this and believes that it means raised him by hitting him. Pip is the narrator of Great Expectations, with his perspective being the only one the reader sees. At first, knowing poor Pip's thoughts helps the reader sympathize with him as his sister raises him "by hand." And the way he feels about everyone else's actions towards him. We sympathize for him when he first meets Magwitch, the convict, and we feel pity for him while he falls in love

Sympathy for Magwitch in Great Expectations

1512 words - 6 pages Great Expectations - sympathy for Magwitch. We sympathise for Magwitch a great deal in this book even though he is intimidating at first. As we see his softer side we begin to like him and are touched by the gratitude he shows to Pip later on in the book and the strong friendship they form with each other. The way Magwitch is exploited by the legal system upsets us a great deal and increases the pity we have for him. Dickens' methods of

In the Book Great Expectations, who most influcened Pip? Book: Great Expectations Author: Charles Dickens

1153 words - 5 pages quickly becomes embarrassed of his past. Joe does not understand why Pip is angry with him but still tries to help Pip. Much of Pip's kindness comes from Joe, when Estella makes fun of Pip for calling the cards "jacks" Pip does not retaliate but instead ignores her. Pip does not begin to appreciate Joe's lessons until much later in the novel. "Pip, dear old chap, life is made of ever so many partings welded together, as I may say, and one man's

Orlick as the Dark Side of Pip in Dickens' Great Expectations

2293 words - 9 pages Orlick as the Dark Side of Pip in Dickens' Great Expectations Charles Dickens’ aptly titled novel Great Expectations focuses on the journey of the stories chief protagonist, Pip, to fulfill the expectations of his life that have been set for him by external forces. The fusing of the seemingly unattainable aspects of high society and upper class, coupled with Pip’s insatiable desire to reach such status, drives him to realize these

The Relationship Between Pip and Abel Magwitch in Charles Dickens' Great Expectations

2109 words - 8 pages The Relationship Between Pip and Abel Magwitch in Charles Dickens' Great Expectations In this essay, I am to observe the changes in

Dickens' View of the World Shown Through the Narration of Pip in Great Expectations

749 words - 3 pages Dickens' View of the World Shown Through the Narration of Pip in Great Expectations Reading the opening chapter of Great Expectations demonstrates something of the extraordinary range and power of Dickens language. After a brief statement about his self-naming, which in itself is important as it instigates the whole debate about identity in the novel, Pip goes on to entertain us with an amusing description of his family

How people effect Pip and are effected by himre, in Great Expectations by Dickens

762 words - 3 pages gave to Estella. The problem with this is he is setting himself up for a disappointment. Estella has been brought up by Miss Havisham to have a heart of ice. The result is that she can not love anyone, not Pip or Miss Havisham. Estella even tells Pip this but because his love is so great he does not take it seriously and eventually his heart is broken when she marries Drummle, who is a complete loser in Pip's eyes.Another of Pip's unfavorable

Pip in Charles Dicken´s Great Expectations

775 words - 4 pages In the novel Great Expectations, the author, Charles Dickens, creates the dynamic character of Pip. Pip begins as a young 7-year-old boy with no dreams for the future. He evolves into a confident, successful gentleman by first visiting the stage of an egotistical young man. Pip changes by his relationship with money and other characters in the book. Pip evolves from an unambitious young boy into a high class, successful gentleman, predominantly

Similar Essays

Creation Of Sympathy For Pip In Charles Dickens' Great Expectations

2476 words - 10 pages Creation of Sympathy for Pip in Charles Dickens' Great Expectations Works Cited Missing "Great Expectations" presents us with a picture of a vulnerable child growing up with unfriendly people and a hostile setting. The use of the first person enables Dickens to give the reader detailed insights into the

Sympathy For Pip In Great Expectations By Charles Dickens

1649 words - 7 pages Sympathy for Pip in Great Expectations by Charles Dickens For the past half term, in English, we have been spending our lessons on a novel by Charles Dickens called 'Great Expectations' We have been concentrating on the opening Chapters as well as to understand the novel. 'Great Expectations' is based on a boy called Pip. Pip is an orphan who lives with his cruel sister and husband Joe Smith who's a blacksmith. He is

How Does Dickens Make The Reader Feel Sympathy For Pip In Extracts From 'great Expectations'?

1783 words - 7 pages The extracts I will be analysing are from the novel ‘Great Expectations’ written by Charles Dickens. I am going to be describing how Dickens has succeeded in making the reader feel sorry for Pip. Dickens used his own experiences as a boy to help him write sympathetically of being a young child, his family had no money and got transferred from city to city until he was ten years old, his father was also sent to prison for six months

Pip In Dickens' Great Expectations Essay

1364 words - 5 pages Pip in Dickens' Great Expectations I agree that all the adults Pip meet fail him in some way. The first character Pip comes in contact with in the novel is Mrs Joe. Rather than mothering Pip and giving him all the care and attention he never got she neglects him and treats him very roughly. She had brought Pip up "by hand" and used "Tickler" on him a number of times. She never says anything pleasant to Pip and I think