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High Tide In Tucson By Barbara Kingsolver

741 words - 3 pages

Writing Review - High Tide In TucsonIn High Tide In Tucson, Barbara Kingsolver touches on many aspects of living and the nuances that make life worth living. Her series of essays depict many situations found in life with a new light of clarity. In her essays, she is able to draw from her experiences to teach others the many life lessons that she has learned. Since all the essays involve narratives in her eyes, the reader is able to grasp the personal aspect and to feel as if they too have had the same experiences. Kingsolver also displays awe for the natural world and a passion for protecting it. She respects all the world's cultures without undue glorification, admiring their virtues and discussing their flaws evenhandedly, showing her judicious views on life. Her essays shed new light to those who are trying to find their way in life.All the passages have a very personal tone as if the reader knows all that Kingsolver is thinking and doing at a given situation. This closeness makes her story more realistic and believable for the readers. It is this sincerity and openness that warms the hearts of readers. For example, she writes, "For each of us--furred, feathered, or skinned alive--the whole earth balances on...In the best of times, I hold in mind the need to care for things beyond the self." In this quote, she is baring her emotions and beliefs regarding the environment, a subject that will be touched upon. In the paragraphs following that, she asks herself questions and tries to answer them with her heart of gold. The very personal touch just makes the reader want to know more about the author and persuades them to read on, even other books published.Kingsolver has always been known as an advocate of nature. She devotes much respect to the other inhabitants of her world. Whether regarding palm groves in Spain, endangered nene birds, tomato plants or pupfish, she speaks with a biologist's knowledge of the flora and fauna around her. Not only does she love Nature for the sake of life, but she is also is a mother fiercely trying protect the world's...

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