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Teenage Rebellion Against Authority Figures, Dialogue Essay

883 words - 4 pages

“How are you today, Logan?” Sharon my shrink asks me. My mother tells me not to call her that, but it is what she is, isn't it? Always digging into my life through these once a week hour sessions of pure torture; trying to find the root of my problems and turn me back into that cheerful boy I was at age ten. My mother is never even home, why does she care what I’m like anymore? Isn’t it acceptable to grow up and change? Seven years that cheerful boy has been transforming into what I am now. What am I? Who am I? Thats the question we’re all trying to figure out about ourselves.
“Same as always; schools a drag, parents are a nuisance.” I reply.
“Have the exercises I gave you helped ...view middle of the document...

“What does it look like? Surely you wouldn't figure my high class parents are disowning me until I turn back into the prom queen they raised me to be. I finally stood up to them saying I can be whoever I want regardless of their opinion. Why are you defying us Amanda? We give you everything you could ever want.. Yeah, yeah, yeah well you're not the one who goes to a school where everyone who you're supposed to be pretends you don't exist anymore.”
“Wow, suddenly my parent problems don’t seem so bad. I’m Logan by the way.”
“Yeah I know, we go to school together. You’re the one who egged Mr. Landons car last month right?” chuckles, “Classic, yet hilarious. Want a smoke?”
“Why not?” I say as she hands me a cigarette and a lighter. I take a drag and slowly blow out the cloud of smoke. Egging Mr. Landons car was my last chance to prove my mother of my dignity and to not end up at a shrinks office, which I blew. He had it coming though, isn't it a school policy not to dig into you students personal business? Sorry, but you cant force students to write a paper on how their parents inspire them when you barely have anyone to call you parents.
“I’m supposed to have the next session with Sharon, but do you want to get out of here...

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