Tess: A Interpretation That Describes Angel As Disilusioned Through His View Of Farmers And Tess. Perputuates The Effects Of This Misonception On Angel

884 words - 4 pages

In Tess of the D?Urbervilles, by Thomas Hardy the stagnant main character Angel Clare perpetuates a virginal/pure dream-reality of Tess Durbeyfield. Hardy displays, tragedy by showing Angel?s struggle between illusion and reality, not only with Tess, but also with his pre-misconceptions of the lives of a farmer. The tragic flaw is the mistake of making a misunderstanding. The tragedy of human existence, spoken of by Thomas McFarlane, is the perpetuation of those misunderstandings. Mirrored through all of human existence is the tragedy of the struggle of working past those misconceptions, and explicitly Angel?s struggle with Tess?s dream reality.Angel?s contemplations of farm folk as ?the pitiable dummy?(134) and his time spent as a pupil to the dairy are misconceptions perpetuated by him in the beginning of his appearance in the novel. In this example, his struggle is reflected more internally than externally. ?. . . but this was all his local livery. Beneath it was something educated, reserved, subtle, sad, differing.?(128) Tragic and contradictory in nature, the struggle of Angel to persist in becoming a farmer is reflective of his ability to cope with misconceptions of the common farmer. Angel portrays the opposite reflection compared to his family when looking through the ?mirror? of his life. Angel?s mirror experience is looked upon as one that is ?rebellious?. Everything he does is so extreme opposite from the path his family paved for him. All of Angel?s family had attended a prestigious university, and had gone on to be clergymen. Angel on the other hand, decides to venture down another path and be a farmer instead of a clergyman. Angel?s decision to be a common farmer pressures him to attempt to please his parents, especially when choosing a spouse. His internal struggle is between choosing the pure and loving farmer?s wife, whom he desires, or the well-established, Christian wife, which his father wants for him. Thus although Angel is the opposite mirrored of his family his struggles allow him to be a an exact reflection of human existence, and their struggles against misconceptionsCorrespondingly, the continuance of Angel?s dream-reality can be seen in the way he idolizes Tess. ?I know you to be the most spotless creature ever lived?(192). The struggle in this situation comes from the fact that he cannot come to the realization of Tess?s impure act. The paradox was that the denial (truth) seemed real yet the ?truth between a man and woman,? (192) namely Tess and Angel was not truth, because he did not know about her rape, nor did she know bout his falling out with an older woman. This lack of...

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