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The Two Types Of Underprivileged People In To Kill A Mockingbird

597 words - 2 pages

In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, the main character, “Scout” learns that there are two types of underprivileged people in this world. The first type of poor people are those such as the Cunningham’s, who are so humble, that they manage live with the very little that they have. The next types of poor people are those such as the Ewells, who are a load of filthy, drunkyards. This family takes everything for granted, without the least bit of appreciation. These two families are examples of the poor people in this world.
A big aspect of these two families that tells a lot about there personalities is there overall appearances. Walter Cunningham’s display is tidy and very clean. This fact is shown when Scout notices Walter in her new classroom and how he looks on his first day. “He did have on a clean and neatly mended overalls.”(19). His appearance shows how the Cunningham’s try hard not to look like beggars. Unlike the Cunningham’s, Burris Ewell does not dress like he is proud at all. In fact he does not care if he looked like a smelly, filthy rat. When Scout sees him in her class, she realizes that he has a different appearance than Walter, a more revolting one: “He was the filthiest human I had ever seen. His neck was dark gray, the backs of his hands were rusty, his fingernails black deep into the quick.”(26-27). This indicates that Burris’s family does not care about how he looks when going to school, or his first impression. Another huge difference between the Cunningham’s and the Ewell’s is there behavior toward school. Walter is a very good student, he is quiet and he is also honest about his studies. Scout finds this out when Walter tells...

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