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The Absence Of Humanity In The Modern World

652 words - 3 pages

Koyaanisqatsi is a film that focuses on the societal changes that humanity has undergone with the advancement of technology. It shows humanity's lack of respect and appreciation for each other and all that surrounds us. Ultimately, the documentary depicts society as thoughtless robots, devoid of any intelligence or empathy. Koyaanisqatsi wordlessly communicates this by contrasting views of nature and man-made mess of cities, or hotdogs on an assembly line and people boarding a subway train. It also touches on our tendency towards violence and hatred, pushing away enlightenment and education. This plays into one central theme: Humanity is not paying enough attention to things that ...view middle of the document...

The woman actively isolates herself from the people around her to play a game, instead of doing something thoughtful or interacting with others. Society is shown to be selfish and robotic consumers, devoid of any social skills or interaction.
Koyaanisqatsi displays the issue of conformity in society as well as the rushed and busied way that most people live their lives with shots of hotdogs on an assembly line, and contrasts this with views of individuals. The similarity between the two is that both are exceptionally artificial and are moving at an extremely fast rate. Each hotdog (each person) is identical, part of a larger, artificial unit. Humanity does not consist of individuals, but is rather a large group of polluters and consumers. To contrast the idea that we are all simply duplicated chunks of meat, Koyaanisqatsi shows shots of individual people on the street, and even then, every face shown is emotionless. This reinforces the meaning that society should embrace what makes us different and regain that aspect of what makes...

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