The Abstract Concept Of Freedom Essay

693 words - 3 pages

Abstract Concept - FreedomFreedom. It is the absence of necessity, one's right to do whatever they please. An open-ended, infinite journey into the depths of creativity where one is not restricted by rules and regulations. People are able to find freedom within themselves and in the world around them. It is the result of lifted pressures and expectations given to people. Many people have images of freedom they have developed through experience and cultural immersion. Cultures all have their own view of freedom, often regulated by the nature of the government. Freedom can be frightening to many, exploring new areas they have never ventured upon. Where as others, who are deprived of their freedom live miserable lives in comparison. No matter what context freedom is discussed, it always differs depending upon the individual and the opinions they have formed toward it. The impression one has of a concept is often supported with images. These images develop from life experiences and the denotation one gives them.Culture and experience are main factors in one's perception of concepts. This applies more directly to freedom than most concepts as a result of its many possible contexts. People's perception and opinions of things are greatly affected by their surroundings. People regard their personal freedom differently in different regions of the world. This comes as a result of the restrictions the government places on them. The United States is the most free nation in the world in that sense because of the freedoms each individual is given. Every citizen is given natural rights and these are protected by the government. While in many other nations, the government its' self is often the one violating the rights of the citizens. If not directly, indirectly, because of lacking responsibility. The United States has adopted the bald eagle as the symbol for justice and freedom. To many Americans this has become their concrete image of freedom because of their exposure to it. One's surrounding greatly affect their perception, including the concrete images they associate with...

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