The Adhd Rating Scale Iv Essay

867 words - 3 pages

The ADHD Rating Scale-IV is designed to be used with children ages 5 to 18 and consists of scales for the Home and School. The Home version is also available in Spanish. The scales are rated according to symptom frequency on a 4-point scale of 9 to 3 (never or rarely) to (very often) and each has 18 items. The checklists are designed to be completed by parents and teachers who have observed the child for six months. Divided across four age groups, the scores are reported as percentile ranks separately for boys and girls. The breakdown of age groups is from 5-7, 8-10, 11-13, and 14-18 for both the Home and School version. The rating scales produce three scores: Inattention (IA), Hyperactivity-Impulsivity (HI), and total. According to Lindskog (1998), “On both forms, the Inattention scale consists of the 9 odd-numbered items, and the Hyperactivity-Impulsivity scale consists of the 9 even-numbered items, which are alternated to reduce response bias.” It is notable that the reviewer states the ADHD Rating Scale-IV is not intended to be used alone in ADHD diagnosis, but rather should be used with other more comprehensive sources such as diagnostic interviews, behavioral observations, and behavior ratings (Lindskog, 1998).

One notable feature of the Fourth Edition is the change from previous versions of the scale in terms of parallel criteria from the DSM-IV. According to Lindskog (1998), “The authors used both exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis with national populations in excess of 4,000 to determine if 'these scales would conform to the bidimensional structure of the diagnostic criteria' (manual, p. 5) for both the Home and School scales, and concluded that the scale items align with both a one- or two-factor (IA, HI) model. In addition, among the many behavior checklists for diagnosing ADHD, very few include items that mirror the DSM-IV criteria. With regard to reliability and validity, both the School and Home Version of the ADHD Rating Scale-IV measured internal consistency reliability with a coefficient alpha. In addition, test-retest ratings for reliability were conducted four weeks apart. To examine criterion validity issues, the authors compared the ADHD Rating Scale-IV: School Version with areas of the Conners' Teacher Rating Scale-39 (CTRS-39) (Lindskog, 1998). The instrument was normed by using the information obtained from the above-mentioned populations used for the factor analysis studies; random selection was used to select cases from the factor analytic sample (Lindskog, 1998).

Among the special considerations that the reviewer found, African Americans were overrepresented on both versions of the inventory, especially in the School Version (21%). Unfortunately, this study did not include information about Latino students although there is a Spanish version of the instrument. According to...

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