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The Advantages Of Communism In Eastern Europe

895 words - 4 pages

The collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe had significant negative effects on crime rates, poverty levels, and civil rights issues, all of which had been kept at bay during the Communist party's rule over Easter Europe. Just as the Berlin Wall crumbled to the ground so did the hopes and dreams of the newly freed citizens of post communist Europe. Crime rates, poverty levels and civil rights violations took a turn for the worst.Shortly after the fall of communism, crime in the east rose greatly, some police couldn't do anything to stop it, others wouldn't do anything to stop it; gangsters were helped by corruption and inexperience among the police force and adapted very well to the free market economy (A1). Even some government party leaders joined forces with the criminals to promote commercial interests, weapons sold by Russian generals were distributed to anyone even terrorists and gangsters (D2). Thefts became common; "People stole produce and tools from their work places to trade with others who had stolen from their employers. The new government made little attempt to restrict such practices. The streets were full of beggars." (D1). The crisis even started affecting other countries when "The illegal export of Russian diamonds threatened to ruin the world market." (D3).Along with high crime rates Eastern Europe was also stricken with poverty. "Unemployment has suddenly skyrocketed in East Germany shocking the newly democratic nation with a debilitating social problem neither its leaders nor its people have experienced with." (B1). In the old soviet bloc a job loss average of about 10% was achieved when some 25million lost their jobs. (A5). A good example of how brutal the transformation has been is Mr. Vrtic. "Vrtic, who has two sons, has scraped by with odd jobs, most recently as one of the 100 security guards who patrol the idle steel mill. He makes about 60 percent of what he used to make." (A10). Another issue with poverty in post communist Eastern Europe is the grate increase in homelessness. "There are estimated to be anywhere between 5,000 and 9,000 homeless adults in Bucharest, a city of 2.2 million." (F8). These unfortunate citizens have learned to live without electricity, heating, running water or garbage disposal facilities since non-have a steady form of income. (F5). Along with homelessness government money issue and inflation are a big problem, foreign debt, antiquated industrial plants and consumer shortages have wounded the economy of the east. (E1) The government money issues have even affected the agricultural industry "As 1992 ended, although food productions was only 9 percent down from 1991, government funds were so depleted that the state could not pay farms for produce." (D4). With government...

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