The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn, By Mark Twain

1627 words - 7 pages

Imagine taking a great and adventurous trip along the Mississippi just a few years after the great Civil War. Well, that is a voyage that young Huck Finn took in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer written by Mark Twain. In this book, many aspects of Huck and his civilization or lack-there-of are brought up for discussion. As the reader progresses through the story, he or she will soon discover that it is not Huck whose civilization should be up for question but Pap’s, the duke’s and king’s, and Tom’s should be analyzed furthermore.
As the reader opens to book, they are soon to realize Pap’s barbarism. Pap is Huck’s father, but his attitude towards life is atrocious. Pap believes that he is significantly sophisticated for the simple reason that he is a white, land-owning male. During the year 1876 when Huck Finn was published, anyone owning land was considered civilized because they had the money to do so. Although this may have been unerring for many people, Pap is different. Pap is an alcoholic that is constantly trying to steal Huck’s money in order to avoid sobriety. Huck has six thousand dollars saved up that Judge Thatcher is conserving for Huck. Pap is constantly reinforcing the idea that Huck should give every cent of his coinage to his father. Every so often Huck sustains a meager sum to enable Pap to buy his palliative. When Pap is angry because of his lack of money, he tends to threaten Huck and lash him. Pap is also exceedingly selfish. He believes that Huck should not be more educated than he, because Pap feels as though children should not be “better” or more achieved than their predecessors. This element is evidently depicted when Huck affirms Pap’s recent threatening remark, “… I reckoned he was gone, he come back and put his head in again, and told me to mind about that school, because he was going to lay for me and lick me if I didn’t drop that” (Twain 30). This quote exemplifies Pap’s loathing towards Huck’s education. It shows that Pap is willing to beat Huck in order to keep him distant from a decent education. On the other hand, Huck is profoundly cultivated in his bashfulness. Huck’s humility is displayed continuously throughout this classic novel. One instance is when Pap is arguing with Huck for lying about his ability to read, and Huck says, “It’s [the book] something they gave me for learning my lessons good” (29). This example shows that Huck is only reading because he has been taught that an education is necessary, and he does not feel as though he is outdoing his father. Another instance is when Pap accuses Huck of keeping money from him. Pap is constantly threatening to get the law involved so that Huck will have to give him his money, but Huck maintains the idea that he has not anything more than a dollar and he has something important in mind for it. Frequently throughout the duration of the story, Pap is looked down upon as opposed to Huck. Pap is a highly intolerable person while Huck shows his reserved personality....

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