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"The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn" By Mark Twain Jim And Huck's Relationship: An Analysis Of Twain's Writing Style

1306 words - 5 pages

It was just dark now. I never went near the house, but struck through the woods and made for the swamp. Jim warn't on his island, so I tramped off in a hurry for the crick, and crowded through the willows, red-hot to jump aboard and get out of that awful country. The raft was gone! My souls, but I was scared! I couldn't get my breath for most a minute. Then I raised a yell. A voice not twenty-five foot from me says:"Good lan'! is dat you, honey? Doan' make no noise."It was Jim's voice--nothing ever sounded so good before. I run along the bank a piece and got aboard, and Jim he grabbed me and hugged me, he was so glad to see me. He says:"Laws bless you chile, I 'uz right down sho' you's dead ag'in. Jack's been heah; he say he reck'n you's ben shot, kase you didn' come home no mo'; so I's jes' dis minute a-startin' de raf' down towards de mouf er de crick, so's to be all ready for to shove out en leave soon as Jack comes ag'in en tells me for certain you is dead. Lawsy, I's mighty glad to get you back ag'in, honey."I says:"All right--that's mighty good; they won't find me, and they'll think I've been killed, and floated down the river--there's something up there that'll help them think so--so don't you lose no time, Jim, but just shove off for the big water as fast as ever you can."I never felt easy till the raft was two mile below there and out in the middle of the Mississippi. Then we hung up our signal lantern, and judged that we was free and safe once more. I hadn't had a bite to eat since yesterday, so Jim he got out some corn-dodgers and buttermilk, and pork and cabbage and greens--there ain't nothing in the world so good when it's cooked right--and whilst I eat my supper we talked and had a good time. I was powerful glad to get away from the feuds and so was Jim to get away from the swamp. We said there warn't no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don't. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft.-Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (115)Mark Twain'sAdventures of Huckleberry Finn describes the experiences of a teenage boy, Huckleberry Finn, and his encounters and adventures as he and Jim, a runaway slave, travel down the Mississippi River. Oftentimes they are separated from one another and fortunately they always find their way back to each other. The above passage details a situation in which they are once again reunited. They are both very relieved to be back together once again. Shortly before this passage, Huck witnesses a feud between two families that comes to a head and results in a gunfight. Huck sees the carnage and is very afraid. When he returns to Jim in the boat, Huck feels safe again. The special relationship shared by Huck and Jim is clearly shown by Twain's use of diction, syntax, and tone.Twain's use of diction is the first literary device to note. The diction throughout the passage is very informal, using colloquialisms and slang words. Especially in the case of...

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