This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Is Not A Racist Book

663 words - 3 pages

Is the Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Racist or Not? The book Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is not a racist book. The main arguments against it are the characters’ personalities and the dialect they used. This book is criticized by Twain critics and on the top ten ban list for school reading material. If people just concentrated on the main plot of the story, instead of the fine details that makes the novel realistic, they would agree that the accusation of this novel being racist is ridiculous. Huck Finn was abused by his father all throughout his childhood.
He lived in constant fear of his surroundings and didn’t lead an exactly normal life. When he finally decides to get out of his predicament and stages his own death, he meets up with Jim on Jackson’s island. As Jim’s quest for freedom and a better life continues he and Huck become closer. Huck’s conscience is leading him to believe different things throughout the novel, like whether he helping Jim to freedom is the right thing to do. But, in the end Huck realizes he could never betray his friend, Jim, who has risked his life for Huck and who has become the closest friend Huck ever had and will ever have. The language is the major argument against this novel. The use of language is not Mark Twain’s view point or the way he speaks, but is the way people actually talked back then in the South. Like when Huck Finn says, “Miss Watson’s big nigger, named Jim.”

Huck is just referring to Jim that way because that’s how he was raised and that is how everyone spoke back then. Even when Huck thought of Jim as a friend he still used the word “nigger,” but he didn’t use it in a harmful way, as of to insult anyone, but just...

Find Another Essay On The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is Not a Racist Book

Critical Book Review of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

738 words - 3 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel about the uncivilized river life of a boy named Huckleberry Finn, but is also the portrayal of life in the south before the Civil War. Mark Twain wrote this novel and its predecessor The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Twain grew up along the Mississippi River in Missouri and had a rough childhood. But he became one of America's greatest authors. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is well-written

The adventures of Huckleberry Finn Essay

1060 words - 4 pages were treated like slobs. They were not fed or taken care well enough to survive. Who were the people who treated the slaves so badly? The white rich slave owners were the ones. Throughout "Huckleberry Finn" the people or race who were being mocked were the white society. Because of this Twain feels guilty and even mocks himself. He mocks Huck when Huck plays a trick on Jim. So throughout the whole story, the purest character in the book is Jim. Jim never hurts anyone but gets hurt several times. Mark Twain states clearly in the novel that we are all hypocrites.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

888 words - 4 pages Jocelyn Chadwick-Joshua accurately asserts that in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain uses chapters one through sixteen to establish Huck and Jim as characters and to develop their relationship. To begin, Twain portrays youthful Huck as a remarkably developed, multifaceted character. Huck Finn is very independent, and likes to have control of his own life. Taking matters into his own hands, “I judged I’d hide her good, and then

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1410 words - 6 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a classic work in American literature that is used in classrooms everywhere to educate and enlighten students. Twain’s work despite being over two hundred years old is still to this day the premier example of American literature and at the time of its creation served to show the world a new movement in literature into realism and satire and away from the romanticism of the 1800’s. Despite the incredible

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

975 words - 4 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is a classic American novel. In the novel, Twain develops the plot into Huck and Jim's adventures allowing them to weave in his criticism of society. The two main characters, Huck and Jim, both run from social injustice and both are distrustful of the civilization around them. Huck is considered an uneducated boy. He is constantly under pressure to adjust to the "humanized" surroundings of society

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1565 words - 6 pages Although in reality and illusion may be mistaken for one another and they both play a large part in the novel “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” illusion and reality differ in how they impact the minds of characters. Near the beginning of the novel, Huck Finn fakes his own death to protect himself and escape from his father. He later meets the Grangerfords, who are locked in a blood feud with the Shepherdsons. One of their daughters

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1210 words - 5 pages that person who thinks for himself without feeling the pressure of those around him. Huck is on his way to becoming “a great man”, but needs to solidify his own beliefs and ideas before reentering civilization so he does not conform back into the boy he once was. Bibliography Twain, Mark. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press, 2003.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - 838 words

838 words - 4 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain’s continuation of Tom Sawyer follows the misadventures of Tom’s friend Huckleberry Finn and a runaway slave, Jim. The story opens with Huck who is living with Widow Douglas and her sister Miss Watson. The sisters are trying to civilize and educate the unwilling Huck who is not happy with his new life of church, school, and manners. Right as Huck is coming to terms with this new

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - 1450 words

1450 words - 6 pages Huckleberry Finn is a thirteen year old boy living in St Petersburg Missouri with the Widow Douglas and her sister Mrs Watson. He is an immature and uncivilized boy who rejects the teachings of Mrs Watson and Douglas. During this time slavery is not yet abolished so they were accompanied by several slaves. Jim, one of the slaves owned by Mrs Watson, develops an everlasting friendship with Huck. He and Jim go on many of adventures

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

952 words - 4 pages In the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, there are many questions that are not answered. Twain keeps Huck and Jim together throughout the novel, for what reason he never says. He keeps the reader in suspense by making Huck and Jim float down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, a slave state, on a raft. Instead of taking the Erie Canal or the Railroads to get to Illinois, Indiana or even Ohio to a free state so Jim can

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1644 words - 7 pages In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain uses Jim as the moral center of the story to depict the hardships, racial obstacles, and stereotypes that blacks endured during the era of American slavery. Dating back to the 1600’s and during the harsh cruelty of the American slave era comes the inspiring story of a black man in search of a new start. Among many other slaves, Jim is brought to an unjust, nefarious reality as he endures the

Similar Essays

Should Huck Finn Be Taught In The Classroom? Twain Was Not A Racist; He Was Simply Exposing Racism In His Novel, The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

726 words - 3 pages whites. There remain anti-black societies, and much hatred is still directed towards them. Clearly there is no possible or feasible way to deter hatred, but by reading and discussing this book in a classroom closely monitored by a teacher, white students can begin to understand how absurd the thinking process was in white people?s minds back in Huck Finn?s time. Twain?s satire incites grief in the reader?s heart with utter irony and acidic sarcasm. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is truly an American masterpiece and should continue to ?rear its ugly head? in our schools.

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Essay 1107 Words

1107 words - 4 pages slavery and racism that occurred. However, the use of the word "nigger" makes Huckleberry Finn a tricky novel to teach. One can fully understand why the book has been repeatedly judged as unsuitable for school children to study in the educational system. The word “nigger” is not used to offend anybody but rather to enhance the story and the time period. Twain’s repeated use of that derogatory term in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Essay 762 Words

762 words - 3 pages Censorship is a shroud for the intolerable, a withdrawal from the cold truths of humanity, and ultimately, the suppression of expression. When a book such as The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is banned in classrooms, students are not only stripped of an enriching work of literature, but also consequently stripped of the cultural and moral awareness required to survive in a world stained with imperfection and strewn with atrocity. To accurately

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Essay 1358 Words

1358 words - 5 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” is a book written by Mark Twain in the late 19th Century. It is considered a timeless classic. It tells of a poor white boy running away from brutal parents, and of an intelligent African American man who attempting to escape from bondage and free his family from slavery, and it shows how these two men, Huck and Jim, very different individuals overcome their differences to