The Americanization Of Anglican Colonies. Essay

764 words - 3 pages

Between the settlement at Jamestown in 1607 and the Treaty of Paris in 1763, the most important change that occurred in the colonies was the extension of British ideals far beyond the practice in England itself. Changes in religion, economics, politics and social structures illustrated this Americanization of transplanted Europeans.By 1763, although some colonies still maintained established churches, other colonies had accomplished a virtual revolution for religious toleration and separation of church and state. As new immigrants arrived from Germany, Ireland and Scotland, along with captured enslaved individuals from Africa, and at the same time the great awakening swept across the North American Colonies, a rapid rise in the number of distinct denominations occurred, which forced the people of different beliefs to endure one another and coexist. This eventually led to the American willingness to tolerate religious diversity. Because of this variety in faiths throughout the colonies, state authorities could not hold any one religion as an established religious doctrine. Consequently this caused a movement toward the separation of church and state so that the government could hold all its citizens as equals no matter what dogma they believed in. Therefore the Great Awakening along with the increase of the diverse cultures in the colonies were the two major reasons for the rapid religious revolution of colonial America from its mother country's original ways, alongside the development of the separation of church and state.In similar economic transformation, the colonies outgrew their mercantile relationship with the mother country and developed an expanding capitalist system on their own. As the demands for goods and services became greater in the colonies caused by the rapidly rising population, small scale colonial manufacturing and a complex network of internal trade developed throughout the states. A lively coastal trade was developed; by the late 1760s, fifty-four percent of vessels leaving Boston harbor were sailing to other mainland colonies rather than to foreign countries. The colonies thus began to move away from their earlier patterns of near or total dependence on Europe for manufacturing. Although the colonies still largely depended on foreign trade and there were often fluctuations, the colonial economy did slowly grow. Therefore even though the colonies still depend on international trade, the development...

Find Another Essay On The Americanization of Anglican Colonies.

The Thirteen Colonies of the United States

1750 words - 7 pages People around the world immigrate for many reasons and have to overcome numerous hardships in their new environment. In the 1600s, many people immigrated to what it now known as the original thirteen colonies. Some of them wanted to start a new life in a whole new place; others wanted to escape from religious persecution and go to a land where religious freedom was available. Whatever the reason, many settled in the colonies and had to find ways

Through the careful reading of American Colonies

1435 words - 6 pages Through the careful reading of American Colonies, written by Alan Taylor, it is clear that there are vast differences as well as a number of similarities between the European competitors as they began to colonize the Americas but diversity can also be found within the colonies they would create. American Colonies shows a close relationship between climate, the state of the economy, and the development of slavery. The varying climate within the

The Independence of Spainish Colonies in America

1150 words - 5 pages The Spanish empire in the Americas faced huge political, social and economic problems in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The empire was stretched to its limit politically and socially with the threat of an uprising from the slave population in its empire. The economy also played a major role and the outlook was just as bleak for Spain with the American colonies drifting towards independence. Spain did not seem able to cope with its

Development Of The Virginia And Massachusetts Colonies

2417 words - 10 pages Wealth is powerful when it is obtained by someone, but even more powerful when it is not. When people are striving for riches they tend to put that need above everything else. People will go through all sorts of difficulties and obstacles to make it in life. Striving for wealth and power is something that brings both positive and negative results. During the colonial period the development of the Virginia and Massachusetts colonies was greatly

Te Pouhere: The Constitution of the Anglican Church in Aotearo, New Zealand and Polynesia

2762 words - 11 pages “Te Pouhere (1991) is a just response to the Treaty of Waitangi and the Gospel in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia”. To answer this question is to examine the very foundations of the Anglican Church in these lands, to explore the history of people and events that brought us to the moment of Te Pouhere’s ratification and to elicit a sense of the forces that drive us as a church, both then and now. With a view to the vast reality that is

The Attitudes of the Roman Catholic, Methodist and Anglican Churches to Homosexuality

3143 words - 13 pages The Attitudes of the Roman Catholic, Methodist and Anglican Churches to Homosexuality Homosexuality is the manifestation of sexual desire towards one’s own sex or erotic activity of one’s own sex. At this moment of time, where homosexuals can be more open about their sexuality; the churches of Christianity find that the acceptance of homosexuals is the innermost issue dividing the churches today. The Christian

In-Depth Analysis of the Unification of the American Colonies

1724 words - 7 pages Since the early seventeenth century to the start of the American Revolution, colonists developed a strong sense of unity and identity as Americans, as they came together to revolt against British oppression, ultimately affecting the development of the American political system, its economy, and its people. However, this did not signify that the colonies unified for the sole purpose of independence, rather the unification was also the result of

The Birth of the United States from the Colonies

1460 words - 6 pages During the time period from 1765 to 1800, the government of the Colonies and eventually that of the United States, dealt with countless issues to create the system which governs the citizens of the United States today. Starting in 1765 with the passage of the Stamp Act by the British monarchy up to 1798 with the election of Thomas Jefferson as President in 1800 by the Colonial government, the aforesaid government, fought to rid itself of

The Involvement of Great Britain in the Colonies

930 words - 4 pages Unlike the settlements of other European states, the British colonies in America developed mostly on their own. During that time, very seldom did the king get more involved than assigning land charters. It was not until about 1650 that a monarch, King Charles II, took a step to become more involved with the self-governing colonies as a result of his brother James’s encouragement to assign a committee to oversee them. About a century after 1650

The Olive Branch Petition: A Unification of the Colonies

969 words - 4 pages reeling from an expensive victory at the battle of Bunker Hill, delegates from the middle colonies (Pennsylvania, Delaware, and New York) saw an opportunity to preserve lucrative trade agreements established with the mother country a century earlier. John Dickinson, a Pennsylvania moderate, engineered the Olive Branch Petition with hopes of shifting colonial frustrations from the king to Parliament, thus convincing the king that the colonies should

Essay on the establishments of the Colonies in America

1123 words - 4 pages Establishment of the Different ColoniesThere were many different reasons why the American colonies were established. Most of the earliest colonists migrated to America because they saw it as an opportunity to become rich. The different colonies were established for different reasons but the motivation all had something to do with religion, economics, or government. Some colonies wanted religious freedom while others were seeking

Similar Essays

The Americanization Of Canada Essay

2755 words - 11 pages . The term Americanization has been around for years. It was first used when the United States was being heavily immigrated into. The new Americans began to enjoy the freedoms associate with our country and gradually began to act less like a foreigner and more like a real American. Today we are able to witness an essence of American culture almost everywhere around the world by what we call cultural icons of our times. Sneakers, blue jeans

Americanization Of The Australian Media Essay

1216 words - 5 pages Americanization of the Australian Media The Australian television and media have become americanised through the influence of American media and television programs in Australia. This research will only concentrate on the extent of Americanisation in Australia through the influence on television and the film industry as the aspect of Americanisation covers a wide range from fashion to language. To fully understand the topic of the

The Americanization Of British Culture After Wwi

2151 words - 9 pages goods, such as music. In fact, many British citizens noticed an increase in American-made goods available in their country. As many men fell in war, America rose as a new superpower, creating situations that would lead to a more homogenous society. American domination of the world market from 1914 to 1930 started the “Americanization” of Britain’s culture through increased American influence and the simultaneous disdain for traditional Victorian

From Out Of The Shadows: Americanization Of Mexican American Women

1486 words - 6 pages , deportation or Americanizing immigrants from Mexico. Women and their children were especially involved in some of the American groups trying to assimilate large numbers of the Mexican community. The history of Mexican American Women in the Southwest and Midwest is mentioned in detail in Vicki L. Ruiz's book From Out of the Shadows and also covers historical background of the author's relatives. Much of the Americanization of American Mexican women