The Armenian Genocide. Essay

1676 words - 7 pages

To take a life with a cause comprised solely of hatred towards a certain race is ghastly. To take over 1.5 million lives driven by the same motive is nothing short of abysmal, yet that indeed took place around Turkey between the years 1915 and 1922 and it is known as the Armenian genocide. The question engulfing one at present is exactly how and why such an appalling atrocity ever took place, as well as the query as to whether or not justice was ultimately served.Before analysing the actual genocide, one must examine the existence of the Armenians before 1915. The Armenian race is indeed that of an ancient one, as its existence has been dated back to the 7th century BCE, where it has subsisted in the southern Caucasus ever since it's fore spoken spontaneous materialization. During the 4th century CE the ruling king of Armenia credulously decided to follow that of a Christian faith, and as a result Christianity has been Armenia's state religion ever since. Problems started arising around the 7th century CE when Islam was founded in the nearby Arabia, and all of Armenia's neighbours adopted Allah as their divinity. It was a result of sticking with the Christian church despite its vast minority in the region that Armenia often lived under foreign regimes, frequently resulting in hardships, persecution, discrimination and abuse. Refusing to convert to Islam can be viewed as being either tremendously courageous through times of trial and tribulation, or masochistically adamant through times of spiritual progression. This difference in interpretation is usually and unfortunately based on the reader's own personal dogma, as that is the way of the monotheistic Judaeo-Christian belief system.During the 19th century, Armenians coexisted happily with the Turks amidst the Ottoman Empire, yet all was not perfect. It was generally accepted that Armenians were that of an inferior race to that of the Turks, and so was apparent through hardships experienced such as heightened taxes and second-class citizenship; however it is worth adding that there was no considerable amount of violence between the two ethnicities. That is, until the late 19th century when throughout the world there was a heightened sense of nationalism and patriotism, yet the Turkish race seemed to adopt more of a jingoistic point of view.It is this jingoism which is mainly responsible for the attempted eradication of the Armenian race, as many Turks then-on envisioned a new Pan-Turkic empire spreading out towards the Turkish speaking parts of central Asia, and the only diverse minority group in the way were the Armenians. After this fact made itself clear to the Turks they acted relentlessly, and between 1894 and 1896 several Armenian massacres were carried out within Turkish Armenian provinces, but this was without the governments consent. The government at the time was conservative and wasn't as aggressive towards the Armenians when compared with the actions of the younger liberal radicals....

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