This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Awakening By Kate Chopin, Paul’s Case By Willa Cather, And Daisy Miller By Henry James

1493 words - 6 pages

Death is the fate of all creatures. From humans to the smallest organisms, such as an amoeba, death is inevitable and cannot be escaped. When pondering upon this, one can find great despair within this truth. Nevertheless, death can be premature. A premature death can be viewed as a death that comes before a being’s average age of death, or in shorter words “expiry date”. To bring this into light, premature death is seen in works of literature, specifically American narratives. Concisely, the narratives that will be brought into analysis include: The Awakening by Kate Chopin, “Paul’s Case” by Willa Cather, and Daisy Miller by Henry James.
Primarily, premature death is seen in the novella, The Awakening by Kate Chopin. In brief, this story revolves around Edna Pontellier, wife of a very wealthy Creole businessman, Léonce Pontellier. The novella focuses on the awakening of Edna who undergoes emotional and mental transformations that lead her to abandoning her lavish lifestyle in order to become “free” in her art, thereby “finding” herself. Feeling trapped by her sumptuous environment, she situates herself in a very infinitesimal abode, described as a “pigeon house” (89), where she remains in solitude. At the end of the novel, she swims out to the sea, ultimately being overwhelmed by the depths and drowns.
In addition, another illustration of premature death is demonstrated in the short story, “Paul’s Case” by Willa Cather. At length, the narrative follows a high school student, Paul. Paul is suspended from his school and is weary of his lackluster middle-class life. Subsequently, he steals $1000 from his current employer and absconds to New York City. At this juncture, Paul reconnoiters the metropolis, only to find that his larceny has become public and that his father’s arrival in New York City to retrieve him is impending. Taking into account the pain and suffering that will be brought to him by returning to his former dreary life, Paul hurdles himself into a speeding train, which eradicates him.
To add to the current discussion, the closing case in point of premature death is illustrated by the novella, Daisy Miller by Henry James. This story depicts the meeting of a young attractive American woman, Daisy Miller, by a “refined” man, Winterbourne in the country of Switzerland. Winterbourne trails Daisy Miller in search of a possible relationship with her. In spite of this, Daisy rejects Winterbourne and goes on to visit Italy where the two meet again. In Italy, Daisy has found herself an aficionado, Giovanelli. At end, Winterbourne encounters Daisy and Giovanelli in the Coliseum at Rome. Hereafter, Daisy contracts a fever and perishes.
Bearing in mind the premature deaths of Edna Pontellier, Paul, and Daisy Miller, the purpose of this essay is to examine the causes for the premature deaths of these characters. Specifically, the argument expounded here will express the themes revealed by the demises of Edna Pontellier, Paul, and Daisy...

Find Another Essay On The Awakening by Kate Chopin, Paul’s Case by Willa Cather, and Daisy Miller by Henry James

The Awakening by Kate Chopin Essay

1148 words - 5 pages through her struggles is to commit suicide. By showing her awakening from her troubles Kate Chopin shows how sexism can affect a woman internally and externally. Kate Chopin tells of a woman in Desiree's Baby who gave birth to a child. As the child grows older, it becomes obvious that the child is of mixed decent. The father grows colder and colder toward Desiree and the baby. Far quite a while she stays and deals with him being cold and distant

The Awakening by Kate Chopin Essay

1107 words - 4 pages Edna Pontellier, the protagonist of Kate Chopin’s The Awakening (1899) who would not allow anyone to possess her, is an example of how the cult of domesticity, prevalent in the nineteenth century, oppressed women as passionless mothers who worship their husbands. While Edna isolates herself from her husband, Leonce, she also isolates herself from her children and, thus, from motherhood. However, Chopin utilizes the motherhood metaphor to

The Awakening by Kate Chopin

1910 words - 8 pages courageous because she was unwilling to give her individuality up for society’s demanding impression. In The Awakening by Kate Chopin, Edna battles oppression from society because she refused to abide by society’s standards of women. She wants to be her own individual and find self worth in herself, but to her dismay this self-journey resulted in her suicide leaving the reader with the deciding factor of whether her act was out of courage or

The Awakening by Kate Chopin - 5354 words

5354 words - 21 pages The Awakening by Kate Chopin Edna Pontellier is considered a dangerous rebel! Her scandalous behavior has been deemed immoral and unfit by New Orleans society. It is feared that her negative influence will be the downfall of women everywhere unless she is stopped. Kate Chopin’s The Awakening is a terrific read and I am hardly able to put it down!  I am up to chapter XV and many of the characters are developing in very interesting ways

The Awakening by Kate Chopin - 585 words

585 words - 2 pages Public ControversyThe Awakening, written by Kate Chopin, was a book that was truly aheadof its time. The author of the book was truly a genius in her right, but yet she wasseen as a scoundrel. At the time, it was 'a world that values only her performanceas a mother, whose highest expectations for women are self sacrifice and self-effacement.' ( ? ) The people of that era were not ready to admit or accept thesimple but hidden feelings of intimacy

The Awakening by Kate Chopin - 1339 words

1339 words - 5 pages Among many poignant lines, Robert Frost stated that “freedom lies in being bold.” Tess Durbeyfield and Edna Pontellier are testaments to the veracity of this quote as both find their independence by boldly exceeding the norm. Their stories were fashioned during a period of great change and both characters are hallmarks of the hope and power women were unearthing at the time. The Awakening by Kate Chopin and Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas

The Awakening, by Kate Chopin

1585 words - 6 pages Illogical, submissive, and sensual are some of the words used to describe the view of women during the nineteenth century. In the novel The Awakening, Kate Chopin tells the controversial story of a woman, Edna Pontellier, and her spiritual growing. Throughout the story, Edna constantly battles between her heart’s desires and society’s standard. The novel shows how two women’s lives influence Edna throughout the novel. Mademoiselle Reisz and

The Awakening, by Kate Chopin

1634 words - 7 pages can be looked upon as the beginning of her journey to self-discovery and the final re-birth for a life unfulfilled on this earth. Originally published in 1899, The Awakening was written by Karen Chopin who some describe as a feminist before her time. The Victorian era was a time period in which women were seen and not heard, which made it hard for the publication of this book since it was about a woman that cheated on her husband, always left

The Awakening by Kate Chopin - 1391 words

1391 words - 6 pages , is that choices have inevitable consequences. This is connected with Realism because a big belief in Realism is; ethical choices are often the subject, character is more important than action and plot. As the reader can see, there are many examples of how realism can be connected with the main idea of this novel. The novel shows the choices the main protagonist makes and the effects they play in the novel. Also, the choices are bigger and are the basis of the novel rather than a plot. Works Cited Chopin, Kate. The Awakening. New York: Avon, 1972. Print.

The Awakening, by Kate Chopin

1150 words - 5 pages In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, a woman's entrapment within a patriarchal society reveals to her the bonds of having to live up the society's standards which further demonstrates the corruption and skewed perspectives of the post-Victorian era. In the novella, Edna Pontellier's, a wife of a rich Creole businessman, sexual and spiritual desires surface themselves which distinguishes a separation between her pursuit of happiness and her

Emily Dickinson's Faith and Daisy Miller by Henry James

1144 words - 5 pages American writers and poets of the 19th century created literature to criticize and detail the imperfections of society. Emily Dickinson, who retired from contact with the outside world by the age of twenty-three in favor of a life of isolation, can arguably be considered such a poet. Her untitled poem "Faith" can be interpreted as criticism of the masculine-dominated society of her time and supports themes in Henry James's work Daisy Miller: A

Similar Essays

Paul’s Case By Willa Cather Essay

1033 words - 5 pages Annelise Rickman Professor Lunsford English 1302 29 May 2014 Paul’s Case A teenaged boy who is in trouble at school, steals money from his employer, and finally commits suicide, is the subject of Willa Cather’s “Paul’s Case.” At his high school, Paul is accused of being “defiant” (Cather, par. 3), showing “contempt” (Cather, par. 3) for his teachers, and having no remorse. Paul works as an usher at Carnegie Hall, and spends some of his leisure

Analysis Of Paul’s Case By Willa Cather

2649 words - 11 pages her childhood and her time spent in a small town she grew up in. Giving her the brilliancy and the ambition to become a writer of short stories which included, Paul’s Case. Themes are represented in all short stories in Paul’s Case, Cather shows the readers a young boy being brought up in a hostile environment whose only dream is to one day pursuiting more than what he came from to make his life better. In Paul's Case by Willa Cather, a boy by

Daisy Miller By Henry James Essay

1009 words - 4 pages nature in comparison to the standards of European society. Winterbourne's opinion of Daisy changes from acceptance to condemnation as his tolerance of cultural standards is clouded by the prejudices of the European aristocrats. Upon their first meeting, Winterbourne is enchanted by Daisy Miller. She was a pretty American girl who was very fresh and different compared to the unmarried women of Europe. Although, at first, Winterbourne was bemused

Daisy Miller: A Study, By Henry James

1204 words - 5 pages The controversial short story Daisy Miller: A Study, written by Henry James, depicts a story of a young European man named Winterbourne trying to come to terms with what he thinks about an American girl, named Daisy Miller. Henry James was born in New York in 1843, but lived most his life in Europe. While he was living in Europe he had many encounters with American tourists. After these encounters Henry decided he wanted to explore the