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"The Bean Trees" By Barbara Kingsolver; "An Instant Bond"; Reflection Upon Relationships Within The Book.

506 words - 2 pages

Everyone had a best friend in first grade. The reason the connection was formed was usual something like a favorite color. Soon, a new friend is found. The cycle will continue until a friend sticks. Usually this person sticks because they have something significant with the other person. Taylor and Lou Ann were raised similarly; because of this, their bond was formed more easily than the bonds they had made with any other person since leaving their respective homes. When connections on a deeper level are found, closeness comes much more quickly.The bond between Taylor and Lou Ann is almost instant. After only knowing each other for a few minutes, they had acted as though they had known each other their whole lives. Taylor recalls "Within ten minutes, Lou Ann and I were in the kitchen drinking diet Pepsi and splitting our gussets laughing about homeostasis and bean turds" (96 Kingsolver). The two found much in common in their background. They could relate to each other with things no one else could, like being a decade behind on technology and trends. They had the same sense of humor, probably because they both had grown up in small rural towns with minimal outside contact. Taylor opens up to Lou Ann about something she had yet to tell anyone else. She admits that "It wasn't an official adoption. Somebody just kind of gave her [Turtle] to me" (97 Kingsolver). Taylor risked a lot in telling Lou Ann this. Lou Ann could have...

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