"The Berlin Blockade Was The Turning Point In The Outbreak Of The Cold War In The Period 1945 1949." How Far Is This Statement Accurate?

2046 words - 8 pages

The Cold War is a prolonged state of tension and hostility held between the two major powers, namely the Soviets and the Americans after post-world war-two period. The term "turning point" implies that the Berlin blockade caused a turn of events and instigated the outbreak of the Cold War. Therefore, the statement made is only accurate to the extent that the Berlin Blockade was the direct factor regarding the outbreak of Cold War, yet it was not the only factor that sparked it off. Rather, it was the interplay of contributing factors such as mutual misunderstanding, conflicting security interests, willingness to support armed forces over and above those heeded for defence purposes, as well as the "doomsday rhetoric". Therefore, it is portrayed that the Cold War was not the product of one event or incident, but rather of the fundamental clash of ideologies and interests between the two powers.The Berlin Blockade was the direct cause of the Cold War, stemming from the unhappiness of the Soviets over the issue of Germany in particular, thus proving to be a turning point in the Cold War. Stalin was unhappy over the Allied plans in Western Germany as stipulated by the Marshall Plan, such as the currency reforms as it would actually stifle the Soviet's chance in increasing its sphere of influence into that area. The blockade therefore was an attempt made by the Soviets to diminish Western influence in Germany. However, the plan backfired due to the US superiority in air, using the Berlin airlift to transport the supplies into their own zone. This directly had negative repercussions in worsening the relations between the two powers, causing the definite split of Germany and leading to the outbreak of Cold War, showing how the Berlin blockade was the turning point in the outbreak of Cold War, by which it was the final straw that actually cemented the Cold War.Despite the Berlin Blockade being the direct factor that caused the outbreak of Cold War, one cannot neglect the factor that actually led to the Berlin Blockade: the disagreement over the German issue. The German issue was split into two areas: the question of reparations for Russia and the territorial and political boundaries drawn. In terms of reparations, the relations between both powers were strained due to the switch of US presidents that resulted in the US going back on its word as agreed in the various wartime conference. At Yalta, Russian demand for $20 billion of reparations from Germany was rejected, with Roosevelt only permitting $10 billion in principle. This however was rejected yet again by his successor, Truman, who was not in favour of it. At Potsdam, the issue was further aggravated when Truman's secretary of state Byrnes asked Russia to obtain compensation from its own zone, which specialized in agriculture. The Soviet Union was only entitled to 25% of Germany's industrial equipment and Byrnes feared that Soviet's demand for high reparation would delay Germany economic recovery at...

Find Another Essay On "The Berlin Blockade was the turning point in the outbreak of the Cold War in the period 1945-1949." How far is this statement accurate?

Which one of the Superpowers was most responsible for the outbreak of the Cold War?

1971 words - 8 pages War, the Korean War, The Angolan War, etc. What seems evident is that both Superpowers were promoting the endless Cold War, but which Superpower is to be blame for the start of this Cold War?In February 1945, a conference in Yalta was held between the 3 Allies, UK, America and USSR. There were many discussions were held on the settlements of post War. Plans were made to determine the final strategies and future peace. During the Yalta conference

'The most important reason why there was little opposition in Germany towards the Nazi regime was its use of propaganda' Explain how far you agree with this statement?

3809 words - 15 pages 'The most important reason why there was little opposition in Germany towards the Nazi regime was its use of propaganda' Explain how far you agree with this statement?Hitler's use of propaganda was very effective. It was in important factor to why there was little or no position in Nazi Germany from 1933-45; however it wasn't the only reason. Propaganda was a very powerful tool; Hitler used it to indoctrinate the German people with his Nazi

"The most important reason why there was little opposition in Germany towards the Nazi regime was its use of Propaganda" How far do you agree with this statement?

1207 words - 5 pages in Theresienstadt. It showed how well the Jews lived under the "benevolent" protection of the Third Reich. When the film was completed, almost the entire "cast" was deported to the Auschwitz extermination camp.The best propaganda coup for Hitler probably happened in 1936. This occurred when the Olympic Games were held in Berlin, Germany. The German's had a brand new stadium built which showed off the excellence of the German facilities. Not only

How the Battle of Midway was the Turning Point of WW2 for America

2404 words - 10 pages offensive. Nimitz sent three aircraft carriers, The USS Enterprise, The USS Hornet and The USS Yorktown to destroy the Japanese. This is just a short overview of The Battle of Midway, or as commonly referred to as, the battle that changed the war. People argue that it had no affect on the war, but those critics couldn’t be farther from the truth. The Battle of Midway was the turning point of the war because it fully enters America into the war

Australia was a better place in which to live for women in 1945 than it was in 1900.' Discuss this statement with reference to the status of women.

1752 words - 7 pages It is evident that overall Australia was a better place to live for women in 1945 than it was in 1900. Throughout our history white settlement in Australia has influenced the role of women within society up until the beginning of the 20th Century. "During the convict period men out numbered women four to one," although the Australian convict period dates back to the 1800's, the fact that women were out numbered to men greatly impacted their

How far could the 3rd Reform Act be justifiably called a turning point?

592 words - 2 pages property owners within the existing system being protected.To a certain extent the 3rd Reform Act was a turning point because not only did it increase the electorate from about 3 to 6 million but also for the first time ever, but also the landed interest was no longer the powerful political class they had previously been. The 1884 Act has been described as 'the most substantial package of parliamentary reform in the 19th century'. because for the

What was meant by non-alignment in the post W.W.2 period? Is it still relevant after the end of Cold War?

1527 words - 7 pages substantiated with the argument of some scholars that the non-alignment worked only during the era of the Cold War and after its fall, it is considered redundant (Rasool and Pulwana 2013 : 64-70). However, contradicts with other scholars view that if the NAM was consider expired and need to be terminated after the end of the Cold War, then NATO, which was created in 1949 during the Cold War to prevent the spread of communist ideology should also be removed

Was the tet offensive a significant turning point?

846 words - 3 pages "The Tet Offensive was a significant turning point in the Vietnam War" How far do you agree with this view?1,200-500 WORDSIntroductionDefinition. The Tet Offensive was a surprise attack by the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong on the Americans. The Americans prevailed, however the public was deeply affected by this event.Two sides to the debateAnswer the question - which side is stronger?Paragraph OnePublic support for the Vietnam War

The Emergence of Television as a Mass Communication Medium Was the Key Turning Point in Improving the Leisure Opportunities for the Ordinary Pe

2438 words - 10 pages The Emergence of Television as a Mass Communication Medium Was the Key Turning Point in Improving the Leisure Opportunities for the Ordinary People of Britain I believe the emergence of television as a mass communication medium was the key turning point in improving the leisure opportunities for the ordinary people of Britain. I believe this turning point was not its first broadcast in 1936 but the introduction of ITV in

'Gallipoli was a turning point in Australia's history' Assess the impact of the ANZAC experience on Australia and Australians since 1915.

1223 words - 5 pages 25th April 1915, Australia was never the same again. No longer were we an extension of Britain; we had won for ourselves the right to be acknowledged as a unique and independent nation, baptised by 'fire'. The ANZAC experience is part of what and who we are as Australians.Prior to 1915, Australia was in every aspect a very young country. It had just become a nation in 1901, had little experience in war and still "clung" to England. Many people

Was Mark Twain accurate when naming the period from 1877 to 1914 the Gilded Age?

814 words - 3 pages sole advantage and by establishing huge monopolies, they exploited the lower class, causing social problems, and used their power to influence the government. When naming the period from 1877 to 1914 "The Gilded Age", with gilded meaning covered with gold or deceptively attractive, Mark Twain was totally accurate since at the first glance this period seemed to be perfect and ideal, but at a closer look it becomes clear that the golden coin of the

Similar Essays

To What Extent Were Soviet Policies Responsible For The Outbreak And Development Of The Cold War Between 1945, 1949?

620 words - 2 pages (1947), Romania (1945-1947), Czechoslovakia (1948), and East Germany (1949), all these countries went through a different process, but the results were the same. The Red Army retained a presence in much of Eastern Europe during and after this process. A 'communist zone' was created in Europe. This was seen as yet another example of Stalin's expansionist foreign policy. The Berlin blockade could be another example, 24th June 1948; Stalin closed all

To What Extent Were Soviet Policies Responsible For The Outbreak And Development Of The Cold War Between 1945 1949?

799 words - 3 pages the West zone which directly cost the East Germany a lot of skilled workers because they all fled to the West zone, the effect of the two causes listed previously above could not be neglected. Therefore, even though it was Stalin who started the blockade but it was not entirely his fault in doing so.From the reasons above, examined from military, economic and political point of views, the outbreak and development of the Cold War was not only the USSR's fault, but also the West. Therefore, the Soviets was responsible for it to only an extent.

The Causes And Results Of The Vietnam War Were Those Of A Post Colonial Situation Rather Than Of The Cold War. How Far Is This True From The Period From 1953 80?

1986 words - 8 pages The Vietnam WarThe causes and results of the Vietnam War were those of a post-colonial situation rather than of the Cold War. How far is this true from the period from 1953-80?Aboud Al-AliAs one sets out to observe the underlying causes responsible for the outbreak of the Vietnam War, we notice that it could have a been a result of two main factors which are the Postcolonial situation in Vietnam and the Cold War which had contributed to the

"The Soviet Union Should Be Responsible For The Cold War, Instead Of The Usa." How Far Do You Agree To This Statement?

1287 words - 5 pages it was their duty to prevent USSR from achieving World domination. Thus, the distrust and suspicion generated by the foreign policies of Soviet ultimately caused the Cold War.Traditionalists also feel that the Soviet Union should also be responsible for the Cold War for initiating the Berlin Blockade. In 1948, the three western zones of Germany merged to form a single economic unit and it prospered from aid received under the Marshall Plan. This