This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Biography Of Alfred Hitchcock Essay

1397 words - 6 pages

The Life Of Alfred Hitchcock...IntroRolling up your window at the sight of a passing bird, quickly pulling open your shower curtain when the slightest shadow is seen, and the constant worry of nuclear war with other countries. Birds will most likely never go on a killing rampage, a murder taking place in a shower isn't far fetched, and the threat of war is always present. So, by this we can see the wide range of films directed by the "Giant in Horror", the "Master Of Suspense", and the "Protagonist of Terror", Mr. Alfred Joseph Hitchcock.His early lifeOn August 8, 1899, in Leytonstone, London, William Hitchcock and wife Emma had a son, they named him Alfred J. Hitchcock. His parents, both Irish and Catholic, also had two other children, William Hitchcock and Ellen Kathleen Hitchcock. Young Mr. Hitchcock attended the Jesuits' St. Iganatius College during his early school years. His parents were both very strict. Once when he was young and did something his father didn't approve of, he was forced to stay in a jail cell for ten minutes. Ever since that day he had had a phobia of police officers. At the age of fourteen (1913) a tragedy struck Alfred's life, his father died, this forced him to quit school and search for a job. At age sixteen (1915) Mr. Hitchcock was studying once again at the University of London, however he was studying engineering and navigation, as oppose to what a future director should study. At age nineteen (1918) he took a job at the Henley Telegraph Center as an estimator. Of course as most teens would he managed to go to the cinema regularly, and he fell in love with the silver screen. While working he took night classes in art, and he read as many technical magazines as possible to learn more about filmmaking. From that point on his abilities and talent continued to grow.The middle yearsAt the age of twenty-one (1920) Mr. Hitchcock made one of the wisest career decisions of his life. He heard of a paramount pictures branch called Players-Lasky opening in London. He immediately got an interview for a job, and due to his knowledge of filmmaking he was given a job as an assistant director. A year later (1921) he met his future wife Alma Reville, a co-worker at the office, whom he married five years later at Brompton Oratory. Alma also helped him with the initial script development all the way to the final post-production of most of his films.Two years after working at the office Alfred directed his first film, Mrs. Peabody, however it was never completed. In 1925 Alfred was promoted from assistant director to the position of a full-fledged director. His second film failure occurred in 1925, he directed the film "The Pleasure Garden", although Alfred poured his heart, soul, and even his uncanny wit into this film it was never a success. At the age of twenty-eight (1927) Alfred directed his first successful film, "The Lodger". At that time the film was considered pretty out of the ordinary. A boarder was suspected of murdering...

Find Another Essay On The biography of Alfred Hitchcock

A review of the life of alfred hitchcock and all his works

3870 words - 15 pages upbringing. Once, as a child, when he had done something of which his father disapproved, he was given a note to take to the police chief. The officer read it and put Alfred in a jail cell for ten minutes. "That's what we do to boys who are naughty," he reprimanded. Ever since then Hitchcock has had a phobia for police and police stations, and this fear has manifested itself in many of his films. He attended St. Ignatius College, a Jesuit preparatory

"How does Alfred Hitchcock explore the duality of human nature in the film Psycho?"

1771 words - 7 pages Alfred Hitchcock uses many ways to explore the duality of human nature in his films, especially in the 1960 horror thriller Psycho. The duality of human nature represents our inner self, aspects that are mainly opposites, the light showing good, the dark showing evil, the natural and the unnatural, are just some examples of human nature. Hitchcock explored the duality of human nature using ways such as lighting, dialogue, camera angles, music

A comparison of Alfred Hitchcock and Edgar Allan Poe. For both madness exists in the world

1146 words - 5 pages is not until then that the audience understands fully the disturbed state of the main characters and the twisted plot of their stories.There are many similarities between Edgar Allan Poe and Alfred Hitchcock, in their themes, their methods for reaching the reader or spectator, and their fascination with the human mind and its complexities -- their view of the world. The semblance of two of the most well known masters of terror and suspense is striking -- as seen in Poe's 'The Fall of the House of Usher' and Hitchcock's Psycho. Both men are fascinated by mystery, by horror, by madness, by death.

Creation of suspense in "The Man Who Knew Too Much": directed by Alfred Hitchcock

1235 words - 5 pages Creation of suspense in "The Man Who Knew Too Much": directed by Alfred HitchcockAlfred Hitchcock is one of the most famous filmmakers of all times. His work and name will always remain know throughout all generation. Alfred Hitchcock is synonymous to fear, terror and mostly suspense. His outstanding cinematographic techniques and unique story telling ways are the main creators of this phenomenon, who is able to keep an audience in suspense

Crime Fiction in Arthur Doyles’s "The Hounds of Baskerville" and Alfred Hitchcock´s "Rear Window"

1135 words - 5 pages Popular crime fiction has tended to maintain and challenge the traditional conventions of the established genre for its own contextual purpose. The generations holds Arthur Doyles’s “ The Hounds of Baskerville“ as one of the most endearing classics, revolving around the brilliant deductions of the enigmatic Sherlock Holmes, establishing a series of conventions that were to serve as a catalyst for future writers. In this sense, Alfred

The Original Thriller Was Shadow of a Doubt Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

1564 words - 7 pages Shadow of a Doubt is a thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock that was released in 1943. The film is about a normal family, named the Newton’s, who live in Santa Rosa, California. They receive an unexpected telegram that their Uncle Charlie is coming to visit. The family is excited, especially Charlie Newton who is the older daughter in the Newton family and even named after her Uncle. Coincidentally, when Charlie went down to the post office

Exploring How Alfred Hitchcock Manipulates The Audience In Psycho

2365 words - 9 pages Exploring How Alfred Hitchcock Manipulates The Audience In Psycho Alfred Joseph Hitchcock is thought to be, by most, the greatest film director of all time. He was born in Leytonstone, London on13 August 1899. He directed many great films such as The Lodger, The Birds, Sabotage, Notorious, Rear Window, and of course one of his greatest achievements ever, Psycho in 1960. He directed the first British sound film

The Man Who Knew Too Much by Alfred Hitchcock

1013 words - 5 pages In this 1956 remake of the 1934 version of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much, Dr. Ben McKenna, played by James Stewart, and Josephine ‘Jo’ Conway, played by Doris Day, inadvertently get involved in an assassination plan after a mysterious Frenchman is murdered and their son is subsequently kidnapped. Hitchcock himself said, “Let’s say the first version was the work of a talented amateur and the second was made by a professional

Psycho - by Alfred Hitchcock 1960 as compared to the 1998 version by Gus Van Sant

1847 words - 7 pages In 1960 Alfred Hitchcock created a film so daring and different it is still remembered even today. Other famous films of the time being "My Fair Lady" and "The Sound Of Music", although popular these films were idealistic and picturesque. Psycho brought in the first clips of violence and nudity into cinematography. To compare Alfred Hitchcock's version of psycho to Gus Van Sant's version in 1998 is beyond doubt a problematic deed when the

<About The Birds> It's about the movie <The Birds> by Alfred Hitchcock, a director who like to make scary movie

640 words - 3 pages The BirdsBirds are such lovely animals in the world. But in Alfred Hitchcock's , innocent birds become evil, and even the clever humanity become weakness and helpless.Every unreasonable bird attach happens since Melanie has been to Bedega Bay with two lovebirds in the cage. Why? Why the attack will happen since Melanie comes to Bedega Bay? "You evil, evil, evil!" A woman points at Melanie shouting madly for assuming all occur because of the

An Analysis Of How Narrative And Genre Create Meaning And Response In The Sequence Starting With Marion Crane’s Arrival At ‘The Bates Motel’, Ending With Her Murder In The Shower In Psycho By Alfred...

1960 words - 8 pages depositing it in the bank she works at. The deed done, she takes flight. An expectation is set up that this self created dis-equilibrium will provide its resolution in a conventional fashion. Simply that either she escapes with the money, or she gets caught. However the audience are also aware that as the film is horror there will be a further element to differentiate it from its seeming nature of crime and personal journey. Hitchcock satisfies this

Similar Essays

The Films Of Alfred Hitchcock Essay

667 words - 3 pages The films of Alfred Hitchcock, as even the most casual cinephile knows, manage to blend the comic, romantic, tragic, and political, all with a captivating thriller plot. The 39 Steps and The Lady Vanishes, two works from the 1930s, are no exception. In the former, a Canadian man is charged with the task of carrying a secret into Scotland while on the run from the police; in the latter, an older woman disappears, leaving a bewildered young lady

Alfred Hitchcock: The Master Of Suspense

1973 words - 8 pages “The Master of Suspense” Alfred “Hitch” Hitchcock was a fantastic movie director and lived an interesting life. Alfred Hitchcock was born in London, England, on the day of August 13,1899 and died on April 29,1980. Hitchcock was a relatively quiet person since childhood, and to show his discipline his father had him arrested at the age of five and put him in a jail cell for five minutes. After this moment Hitchcock developed an interest in

The Analysis Of The Film 'psycho' By Alfred Hitchcock

2302 words - 9 pages The Analysis of the Film 'Psycho' by Alfred Hitchcock Write a magazine article in which you discuss Psycho’s Enduring appeal as one of the great films of cinema. Discuss some specific techniques used by Hitchcock which create tension and suspense for the audience. With lower budgets, very basic special effects and black and white picture, Alfred Hitchcock’s psycho still manages to grind out the suspense to compete

Alfred Hitchcock 50 Years Of Movie Magic

2493 words - 10 pages Alfred Hitchcock is among the few directors to combine a strong reputation for high-art film-making with great audience popularity. Throughout his career he gave his audiences more pleasure than could be asked for. The consistency of quality plot-lines and technical ingenuity earned him the recognition of being one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. His films earned him the reputation of being the 'master of suspense', and after viewing two