The Black Panthers Essay

1244 words - 5 pages

The Black Panther Party was first formed in 1966 by Bobby Seale and Huey Newton in Oakland California but effects and calls for Black nationalism soon spread to all corners of the country and which settled within the big cities of America; Chicago and New York in which a large population of minorities were deprived and in which they felt unwanted and uncared for, by their own country and its policies.The Black Panther party pushed their socialist programs and a call for social change within the cities and African American communities. This was attempted through their Ten Point Program in which the need for better housing, the end to poverty, black on black crime, the exemption from military service, police brutality and the need for a better social structure within African American communities. What started out as a need to supply only African Americans with the services and needs of their efforts, was soon labeled as black racism, not only by the white establishment but from within the leaders of the Black Panthers as well. As a result, the Black Panthers soon expanded their circle of influence to previously deprived white groups, usually Communist and other socialist groups which had been set on the fringe of society by America. “The focus in the latter years of the Black Panthers was on social issues as their Ten Point Plan will attest. Even though the reign of influence within the Black Panther party, as it related to a national movement, lasted less than a decade, in that time, positive social change eventually sprang up from its origins and efforts of the masses.” (Robinson, S. 2007)The Panthers assumed a Robin Hood type roll of distributing money and services to the community. Through legal and illegal money the BPP was able to improve many of the facilities that were used by African Americans. They also improved the services offered through the African American communities. They were able to make the streets safer, set up free clinics in order to provide free medical care, set up programs for schoolchild that provided them with a good breakfast, and made sure they aided the community in every way possible to help bring about positive changeAt this time, “police forces were mainly white in the late 1960's therefore; white officers were deemed a military extension of the oppressive force of the tyrannical government that perpetrated police brutality, urban warfare, and murder. Police officers were not there to protect the community as much as they were to corral and contain the community.” (Sell, H. 2006) The Black Panther party helped establish some of the first police review boards to help police the police. Newton correctly realized that the police themselves could not be trusted to police their own because of similar racist's ideologies and mass corruption throughout the Oakland Police Department. One of the earliest actions that the Black Panthers took was in the Oakland. “Of the more than 660 police officers...

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