The Bluest Eyes Essay

1182 words - 5 pages


A Search For A Self

Finding a self-identity is often a sign of maturing and growing up. This becomes the main issue in Toni Morrison’s novel The Bluest Eyes. Pecola Breedlove, Cholly Breedlove, and Pauline Breedlove are such characters that search for their identity through others that has influenced them and by the lifestyles that they have. First, Pecola Breedlove struggles to get accepted into society due to the beauty factor that the norm has. Cholly Breedlove, her father, is a drunk who has problems that he takes out of Pecola sexually and Pauline physically. Pauline is Cholly’s wife that is never there for her daughters.

Pacola is a little black girl has a hard time finding herself. Brought up as a poor unwanted girl, she desires the acceptance and love of society. The world has led her to believe that she is ugly and that the epitome of "beautiful" requires blue eyes. Every night before she goes to sleep, she prays that may she wake up with blue eyes. The image of "Shirley Temple beauty" surrounds her. In her mind, if she were to be beautiful, people would finally love and accept her. This idea of beauty has been imprinted on Pecola her whole entire life. Many people have inscribed this notion into her. Her classmates also have an effect on her. They seem to think that because she is not beautiful; she is not worth anything except as the focal point of their mockery. As if it were not bad enough being ridiculed by children her own age, adults also had to mock her. Mr. Yacowbski as a symbol for the rest of society's norm, treats her as if she were invisible. Geraldine, a colored woman, who refused to tolerate "niggers", happened to walk in while Pecola was in her house. By having an adult point out to her that she really was a "nasty" little girl, it seems all the more true. At home she was put through the same thing, if not worse because her family members were the ones who were supposed to love her. It was obvious to Pecola that her mother preferred the little white girl of the family that she worked for over her. One day as Pecola was visiting her mother at the home where she is working, Pecola accidentally knocked over a blueberry pie. Obviously burned by the hot pastry, her mother completely ignored Pecola's feelings of pain and instead tended to the comforting of her white "daughter". For a little girl, the love of her mother is the most important love she can receive. Without that, how can she think that she is worth anything at all? Finally the rape by her father is the last evidence Pecola needs to believe completely that she is an ugly unlovable girl. While in most cases a father figure is one who little girls look to for guidance and approval, Cholly is the exact opposite. He hurts Pecola in a physical way that in one attempt measures up to the years of hurtful mockery. After this event, Pecola went insane, forever stopping her from finding what she really is.

Cholly...

Find Another Essay On The Bluest Eyes

The Buest Eye Essay

1285 words - 5 pages The Bluest Eye is one of the most famous and elegant works by Toni Morrison. The novel shows how women are affected by society through the eyes of an African American family during the Great Depression. The novel is being researched because many connections can be made in today’s society. In the novel The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, it provides a detailed interpretation of how the “perfect White American” is the current beauty standard

"The Bluest Eye" by Toni Morrison - the perception of "beauty".

1045 words - 4 pages what it is, dysfunctional.Whiteness is the standard of beauty, according to the characters in "The Bluest Eye", as they all get influenced by others, such as Sherly Temple, and her school friends like Maureen Peal. Pecola, Ms. Breedloves daughters image of beauty is Shirley Temple. White, blonde, tall, and blue eyes, the perception given to her, and unless she achieves these things, she will not be beautiful. Ms. Breedlove also has a perception of

Sexual Content in the Bluest Eye

994 words - 4 pages The novel The Bluest Eye written by Toni Morrison is subjected on a young girl, Pecola Breedlove and her experiences growing up in a poor black family. The life depicted is one of poverty, ridicule, and dissatisfaction of self. Pecola feels ugly because of her social status as a poor young black girl and longs to have blue eyes, the pinnacle of beauty and worth. Throughout the book, Morrison touches on controversial subjects, such as the

The Importance of the Eye in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye

1326 words - 5 pages The Importance of the Eye in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye       In Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, the characters' eyes are everything. The word "eye" appears over and over with rich adjectives that describe color, movement, and nuance of expression to signify a character's mood and psychological state. Morrison emphasizes the paradox of eyes: Eyes are at times a window to enlightenment, however, what eyes see is not always

A Hunger for Love and Respect in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye

3474 words - 14 pages in her critical study, Fiction and Folklore: The Novels of Toni Morrison, that PecoIa Breedlove's self-destructive desire for blue eyes with "the quest for the holy grail, the quest for the silver fleece, or the pursuit of the three golden apples." (43) The Bluest Eye presents a love starved girl, Pecola Breedlove, an eleven year old African- American girl who longs for blue eyes every time as a symbol of beauty because she believes

The influence of a dominant culture on people

1077 words - 5 pages because of her black skin colour and as she wants blue eyes to solve this distaste for her, we can conclude that she feels self-hatred. Another reason for the feeling of self-hatred by the blacks in ‘The Bluest Eye’ is the poverty in which they are represented. The house that the Breedloves live in shows their poverty, especially the furnishings in their house. They bought a new sofa, but when it arrived, it already was broken. They could not afford

Racial self loathing in the bluest eye

1075 words - 4 pages needs the bluest eyes. All of the tragedies in this novel can be directed back to one main issue, whiteness as a standard of beauty. This belief that white sets the standards for beauty is a major factor to the racial self-loathing, which occurred in America in the past as well as today. The show of racism through white beauty, and the desires of the black society to acquire this beauty, led to the destruction of many characters in this book.'The

African American Folklore

2212 words - 9 pages - is what's important"(Bakerman 122).In all of Morrison's novels it is easy to see her use of African- American folklore along with traditional fiction. In the novels The Bluest Eye and Sula, Morrison creates settings and characters that produce an aura of unreality, that which is directly borrowed from African- American folklore. With the aura of unreality in Morrison's characters and settings, her plots scream with real life themes such as

Structural Elements of Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye

951 words - 4 pages eyes.) On the other hand, Pecola and Jane have a few parallels in their lives: both are searching for someone to play with them, and both find the answer in a friend, although Pecola's friend is imaginary. The Bluest Eye is an innovative novel whose touching and compelling story could not have been told without Morrison's unique structural devices. One such tool is the use of seasons to divide the narrative and put an interesting twist on the

Writing Techniques Used in The Bluest Eye

2844 words - 11 pages childhood who had prayed to have blue eyes. The story was well received by the group. Toni put it away thinking that she was done with it. When her sons where asleep, she started writing. She dusted off the story in which she had written for discussion in her writers group and decided to make it into a novel. She drew on her memories as a child and expanded on them with her imagination so the characters developed a life of their own. The Bluest Eye was

Childhood Presented in To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee and The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

3257 words - 13 pages Childhood Presented in To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee and The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison Childhood should be a time of great learning, curiosity, joy, playfulness and guiltlessness. The reality is that it can be a time of extreme vulnerability and dependency. The innocence and fragility of a child is easily manipulated and abused if not nurtured and developed. Family relationships are crucial in the flourishing of young minds, but

Similar Essays

The Bluest Eyes, By Toni Morrison

958 words - 4 pages In “The Bluest Eyes”, the author Toni Morrison portrays the idea of beauty and its standard on African Americans live in the white American society through a narrator named Claudia. The protagonist of Morrison’s novel, Pecola Breedlove, is the truest of all victims, for she is an innocent little girl born into a family that does not provide her with any support to endure society's racial prejudices. The little black girl Pecola is in a mad

References To Society In The Bluest Eyes (Toni Morrison).

587 words - 2 pages that the population had to follow. Therefore, it has been seen that a novel with a very common story could in reality be an accurate reference to the society's flaws. Even though literature often makes references to the real world's society, to what extend is this true in the Bluest Eyes?Toni Morrison's novel The Bluest Eyes takes place in 1941 in the town where the author grew up (Lorain, in Ohio). Indeed, the story contains lots of

The Story Of Pecola Breedlove In The Bluest Eyes By Toni Morrison

1322 words - 5 pages The Story of Pecola Breedlove in The Bluest Eyes by Toni Morrison The story of Pecola Breedlove in The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison is very dramatic. Like a seed planted in bad soil and in a hostile condition, Pecola, a very young and innocent African American girl, does not have a chance to grow up normally like her peers. Her parents' personal history is shown to have played out in extreme measures in her life. Her father, abandoned

Ways Of Raising Children In East Is East And The Bluest Eyes

1723 words - 7 pages words or appalling attitudes, for example. This kind of unusual parents-children relationship can be seen in East is East and The Bluest Eyes. Both of them tell the story on how the parents treat their kids differently than most parents do; and they do it because they have their own reasons.In East is East, George Khan, as the father, is the one who treat his kids badly. He strikes his children for no exact reasons and often pushes his children