The Book Of Judith Essay

1690 words - 7 pages

King Nebuchadnezzar’s seventeenth year of reign of the Assyrians, made war with King Arphaxad, who ruled the Medes. King Nebuchadnezzar had many nations join forces with him. King Nebuchadnezzar and his forces defeated Arphaxad and his army that summer. Nebuchadnezzar and his men took over Arphaxad’s cities and towers and turned the city into shame. Then King Nebuchadnezzar struck Arphaxad with spears and destroyed him.
King Nebuchadnezzar had ordered the people in the west country of Palestine, Syria, and Egypt to join forces with him but they had denied him. They saw no threat because he was only one man. This angered King Nebuchadnezzar because he had ordered them and they did not obey his commands. King Nebuchadnezzar then called his chief general, Holofernes, to gather 120,000 foot soldiers and 12,000 cavalry, and to destroy everyone who did not obey his commands.
General Holofernes gathered all of his soldiers and headed out to the west. He attacked and robbed everyone who had disobeyed his master and captured their territories, killing anyone who got in his way. Burning all the fields and destroying all the young males, Holofernes demolished all the gods of the land. Now the nations could worship only King Nebuchadnezzar as god.
The people of Israel heard of Holofernes destruction of the west nations and then feared him. They were worried because they just recently moved to Judea and their temple had been declared sacred after they moved. The Israelites then prepared for war and started to pray out to God. They cleansed themselves of all sins before the altar of their Lord. They prayed that God was to not give up on their people and land.
When Holofernes found out that the people of Israel had prepared for war he was angry. Achior, the leader of the Ammonites, told how the Israelites had come from Mesopotamia and Egypt but their God told them to leave and go to Canaan. They lived rich lives but then when they started parting from Gods ways they were defeated in battles, and captured. Now they have returned to Gods ways and have started a new life. “Now therefore, my master and lord, if there is any unwitting error in this people and they sin against their God and we find out their offense, then we will go up and defeat them. But if there is no transgression in their nation, then let my lord pass them by; for their Lord will defend them, and their God will protect them, and we shall be put to shame before the whole world,” Achior proclaimed.
After Achiors speech, men started complaining and insisted for him to be killed. They stated, “We will not be afraid of the Israelites; they are a people with no strength or power for making war. Therefore let us go up, Lord Holofernes, and they will be devoured by your vast army.” Holofernes then told Achior that there is no God besides Nebuchadnezzar and that their Israelites God cannot defend them. Achior will then be put to death because he said that there was another God besides...

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