The Boundary Stele: Religious Beliefs Influence Town Planning In New Kingdom Egypt

1473 words - 6 pages

In addition Amenhotep IV’s mother Tiye was a strong Queen and was very much interested in Aten, having schooled Amenhotep IV the religion of the Aten. She was also known for hating the Priests of Amon and did not stand by imperialism. Queen Tiye was a powerful force and was at her husband’s side as evidenced in “monumental statues and numerous royal monuments and private tomb” provide (Arnold 1997:7). Tiye’s role seemed to encompass her in both secular and religious ceremonies and in Nubia; she was venerated as a living goddess (Arnold 1997:7). With relation to statue groups, “Tiye may appear in colossal size, seated by her colossal husband, instead of modestly clinging to his leg as an ...view middle of the document...

The art representations also reflected show the “broodingly introspective figure of Amenhotep IV and later Akhenaten, which contrasts sharply with rulers in the past” making him stand out even more from previous Pharaohs (Wilson 1951:208). Amenhotep IV was wise and reflective, and as time passed, he became more scholarly, and held the role of teacher to better explain Aten to the Children of Egypt as well as other religious concepts and moral principles which involved Maat. Maat, in prior Egyptian culture, could be used to represent a goddess of Justice and Truth, Ma’ at. For the most part, one could easily counter with other scholars when they claim that Maat in Akhenaten’s case was solely relating to truth as Maat truly lay in both aspects of the goddess Ma’at, such as truth and justice. Truth and justice encompass the teachings of Amenhotep IV and the moral codes he set up were created so that Egyptians could become aware of their choices and accept the consequences of their actions. Some could have described Amenhotep IV as an Erudite who gave sage advice to the Egyptian people. To say the very least, Amenhotep IV, later named Akhenaten, could easily be described as multi-faceted in that he was a student, scholar, philosopher, prophet, and an innovative thinker.
It is known for reasonably certain that Nefertiti married Amenhotep IV in her fifteenth year—he was a year older. They were married in the capital city of Thebes, where they remained and began their lives together and built a temple for Aten. Amenhotep IV and Nefertiti had three lovely daughters while living in Thebes and remained there until they moved to the Capital City to Akhetaten. Mereaten, their eldest child, was speculated to have been born before Amenhotep IV accepted the throne. She was depicted following her mother to temples at Karnack and in Thebes, which date back to the earliest parts of Amenhotep’s IV reign (Arnold 1997:10). Mereaten is also seen in a depiction as being “a small figure in a long gown holding a sistrum” (Arnold 1997:10). In the tomb of Meryre, Overseer of the Royal Quarters, remains one place were all six daughters can been seen, in a “place where the “great reception of foreign tribute was held in Year 12 was recorded” as a result it held much art and provides evidence as to how many children the powerful couple raised (Arnold 1997:10).
Amenhotep IV and Nefertiti were very much in love and it shined in everything that the two did together. Evidence relating to the equality in power between the Amenhotep IV and Nefertiti is best found in the religious texts of this period (Lesko 1978:8). For example, this equality is also found in Hymns to Amon, Hymns to Aten, the Boundary Stele, and on the many remaining tombs of the nobles still at Amarna in the cliffs or the boundary of the former Amenhotep IV. This is also supported by the art, all of the reliefs that have remained, on the Boundary Stele, as well as on the tombs of the Nobles. Clegg II, a scholar,...

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