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The Brave New World: Humans Are Machines

656 words - 3 pages

Machines

They are machines, nothing else. All throughout Human’s history, we have been fighting each other physically, artistically, and mentally. Those traits mark the difference in our cultures, thus creating various individual groups. Within a group, there are also varies individual people. Human being are an amazing creature, generally we are not fully mature until past the years 20. Yet many groups in the world mature as young as 14 years old. Often in this world, the olds are praised of their wrinkle and age. Those traits mark their success in life and hardship. Whereas in The Brave New World, many of these trait that mark us as human are destroyed. The work of Shakespeare burned, arts work destroyed, and the last generation killed. When the controllers declared they created stability, in truth they created machines.

Having been self-taught by Pope’s books of Shakespeare, John simply can’t agree with the horrors of the “civilization”. John, as an exotic animal, was lead around showing the wonders of the civilization. When John was shown to the synthetic music boxes he asked “Do they read Shakespeare?”(163). Shaken with embarrassment, the Head Mistress replied “Certainly not,” (163), and the Provost of the Upper School, Dr.Gaffney, added “Our Library contains only books of reference. If our young people need distraction, they can get it in the feelies. We don’t encourage them to indulge in any solitary amusements.” (163). Shakespeare’s works are referred as “solitary amusement”! It is no longer a work of art, just a simple paper with amusing wording on them. The artistic side of the brain of the people in Brave new World has been completely erased, thus erasing people to have feeling. All of these just for the stability, making human like machine.

As we are making AI Intelligence in this world, the controllers in Brave New World are making...

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