The Breaking Of A Family In A Doll House By Henrik Ibsen

978 words - 4 pages

The Breaking of a Family

In Henrik Ibsen’s play, A Doll House Ibsen describes the perfect family and the conflicts within. Ibsen examines the normal lives of the Helmer family through the eyes of the wife, Nora Helmer. She goes through a series of trials as she progresses through the play and with each trial she realizes something is missing in her life. Ibsen examines the struggles within the house.
Ibsen opens the play with the perfect home where Nora is planning Christmas and how she is planning every detail with no concern for her own needs. Torvald asks Nora, “what have you thought of for yourself?” (Doll 1). Nora replies that she doesn’t, “want anything at all.” (Doll 1). Nora ...view middle of the document...

Ibsen regards this conflict between Nora and Krogstand as the main concern for Nora as she took the loan to save her husband as he was ill at the time. Krogstand takes the contract that Nora signed and uses it as the basis of his argument. When Torvald explains his own feeling with forgery and the crimes that Krogstand has committed, Nora begins to feel scared and she herself begins to question her own moral values and fears that she may bring harm to her family. Nora continues with her own selfless mindset as she cares for her children and for those close to her. Nora feels the weight of her guilt as she explains to Mrs. Linde who she loaned money from and why. Krogstand writes a letter and sends it to Torvald and Mrs. Linde goes off to talk to Krogstand.
Nora’s fears for her family life are exemplified in her own worries as she convinces Torvald to not look at the mail. Nora begins to dance and Nora begins to dance wildly as she let’s go of all her fears and just engulfs herself to the music. In the night Mrs. Linde convinces Krogstand to forgive Nora and to decide against blackmailing her as she wants to be with Krogstand. Nora does not want Torvald to open Krogstand’s letter but she allows him to as she herself admits to her own sins. As she explains her own actions, Torvald runs out and begins to scream at her even as she tries to explain how it was for his own health and how she did it because she loved him. Torvald goes on a long rant and calls Nora a “featherbrained woman” (Doll 3). Nora also begins to...

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