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The Bride Of Frankenstein: The Horror Genre And Perspectives

1449 words - 6 pages

“Although Tuesday's film might have been a little slow and not as scary as some other films, it obviously played an important role in defining the horror film standard. I think that almost every aspect from the movie has been copied. The fact that the "bad guy" is usually odd and in some ways misunderstood is the basis for almost all scary movies. Who is to say that the stalker can't be just the average Joe? It seems like the "peeping tom" scene was developed here, too. In most scary movies, the killer watches his prey from a distance before he attacks. This sort of situational irony (the audience knowing something the character doesn't) builds up tension and suspense. It is a brilliant idea and it is apparent why it has been recycled.”(Frankenstein: The Beginning of a Genre - C.J. Nielsen in Yahoo! Clubs, Wabash Soundtrack Tutorial)“I'm sorry to say but I can't see this as a classic horror film. It seemed to be more of a drama with slow acting skills then an all out horror flick. I also am sad to say that I didn't find the music adding to the scare factor of the film...it was too light and had a fake romantic feel to it. The only part, where I felt the music actually added something was when Dr. Plitorus (or however you spell it) came to the door. The music let you know that this guy was supposed to be the evil guy or villain in the movie. This "theme" sound has been played throughout the movies and is even used today. Sure it isn't the same sounding, but the point of the music is to let you know that this is a bad person. Other then that, I don't see how anyone could be scared by this movie. Sorry...but that is my last word on this subject.”(A Classic… Maybe Not - Dilley, in Yahoo! Clubs, Wabash Soundtrack Tutorial about how The Bride of Frankenstein used music to emphasize its theme and came to be regarded as the movie that gave birth to the horror genre.)What is a horror film? What is the horror genre? A movie that uses its plot and its effects to grip the audience in its terrifying or horrific (a more appropriate word) atmosphere is usually the essence of a horror film. A whole load of movies based on a similar conception constitutes the horror genre. Are horror movies really frightening? The answer to this question lies in one’s perception about what is frightening and what is not. The two sources cited above, clearly show how, when perceptions differ, we come up with different conclusions. I remember being absolutely terrified after having seen Stephen King’s It when I was a ten-year-old. I saw the movie again yesterday and found it to be horribly comical! Why did I see it? To understand how one’s perception of a particular thing can differ when seen from a different angle. I, for one, had to see the Bride of Frankenstein thrice before I could really understand the movie completely.I found the movie farcical the first time I saw it. The music, I felt, really didn’t have much to convey. Then I...

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