"The Broken Heart", By John Donne

731 words - 3 pages

Samantha CoxMrs. Allison ForceAP US HistoryNovember 25, 2013Social and political reformers in the first half of the nineteenth century shared a belief that society and human nature were inherently good, and that changes in both social institutions and people's behavior were necessary to allow humans' natural goodness to prevail.The reformers in both political and social fields during the first half of the 19th century shared views on changes to create a better natural goodness. Reform movements, such as education, prison, mental health, temperance, womens' rights and abolition, all took place around the time of the Second Great Awakening. During this time Americans were rediscovering religious life and believed that they should use faith to spread goodness and justice. Many people felt that they had an obligation to humanity to create a society that would discourage bad and promote good.Many people in the early nineteenth century felt that they had a right to hold men and women equal. In Document A it states, "...woman does not occupy the position in society to which her capacity justly entitles her..." Mrs. Frances Gage, the author, is saying that women have more to give society then they are allowed to show. Women have just as much right to control and take power as men in American society. Gage quotes the bible when saying that even God has made men and women equal, "'Male and Female created he them, and gave them dominion.'" A list of injustices toward women are written in The Declaration of Sentiments. In it it says that women are "direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny" to men. It states that married women are civilly dead and that women have no way to "exercise her inalienable right to the elective franchise."In Documents B and C both go into the educational experiences denied to women during this era of reformers. Education was another major societal aspect of life that many people thought needed improvement. In Document D, Report of the Massachusetts Board of Education, thought that if the wealthy were the only ones knowledgeable in education then all unlearned...

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