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The Canadian Justice System Vs. Aboriginal People

569 words - 2 pages

The Canadian Justice System vs. Aboriginal PeopleTopic: Be it resolved that the Canadian justice system be significantly changed.The Canadian justice system has failed the Canadian people. It has failed the aboriginal people of this nation on a massive scale. The flawed justice system has been insensitive and inaccessible, and has arrested and imprisoned aboriginal people in grossly disproportionate numbers. Aboriginal people who are arrested are more likely to be denied bail, spend less time with their lawyers, and if convicted, are more likely to be incarcerated.It is not merely that the justice system has failed aboriginal people; justice has also been denied to them. For more than a century the rights of aboriginal people have been ignored and eroded. The result of this denial has been injustice of the most profound kind. Poverty and powerlessness have been the Canadian legacy to a people who once governed their own affairs in self-sufficiency.A significant part of the problem is the inherent biases of those with decision-making authority in the justice system. However one understands discrimination, it is clear that aboriginal people have been subject to it. They clearly have been victims of the openly hostile bigot and they have also been victims of discrimination that is unintended, but is rooted in police and law.Two specific incidents in late 1987 and early 1988 clearly illustrate this unacceptable discrimination. The first of these was the November 1987 trial of two men for the 1971 murder of Helen Betty Osborne in The Pas Manitoba. While the trial established that four men were present when the young aboriginal woman was killed, only one of them was ultimately convicted of any crime. Following the trial, allegations were made that the...

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